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Lili, Pituitary Post-Op Update

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hi there…

i had the pituitary surgery.  They said i am cured (of course it could come back) but the day after surgery my acth level was 3.7 and the next day it was 1.  They consider that a cure.

it is a very painful recovery for me and i am documenting each day.

The headaches and pressure in my head were so awful and painful but have now on day 6 subsided.  They had to cut my septum to get through and i had a bone spur too so maybe that added to it…my nose was, still is i am sure, packed and i can’t blow my nose till July 12!  The nausea was bad too.  The cortisol withdrawal hasn’t been so horrible yet.  They have me on a taper program of each week taking less.

The tumor was towards the left side and the surgeon who was Dr. Van Gompel at Mayo was aggressive in the amount of tissue he took out as he said it was soft.  He wanted a “home run”.  I asked after if he got the home run and he said yes.

The whole Mayo experience was strange.  You don’t really get to call and speak to the doctor after you see them…you get a “desk” and a message gets sent.  The endocrinologist is the only one who calls back personally but I guess that is a lot.  I would highly recommend her and don’t know all her info except her name is Dr. Irina Bancos at the Mayo clinic.  Things just fell into place there.  As you know I was only scheduled for the IPSS but when she saw how symptomatic I was and all my levels she picked up the phone on a Tuesday and had me scheduled for surgery Friday morning.  A one stop shop.  I was scared and there alone but got through it.

The next 3-12 months will be difficult.  I am currently on some pain meds and muscle relaxers but in touch with my sponsor daily and we decided I don’t have to be a martyr.  I just need to check myself and get off them as soon as I get these headaches under control.

Mary, I’d like to stay active on your site.  I’ve learned so much that helped prepare me for the doctors appointments and the procedures that I’d like to give back anything I can in the way of my experience of living with the symptoms and not knowing what was wrong with me to fighting for a diagnosis to the cure.  Please let me know the best way I can do this and you may post this if you’d like.  Maybe edit out the pain meds and sponsor part as I don’t think many would relate to that but who knows.

I just know I am grateful to you and this site.

Lili

 

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Barbara S, Steroid Use Bio

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Have been experiencing symtoms since mid90s. Spent almost four years on high doses of steroids for brain tumor, snd diffilculty being weaned off.

Midsection has continued to grow,blood pressure and glucose levels have risen. Upper body muscle has all but disappeared, have the hump on back of neck. Developing facial hair, have lost upper body muscle

No answers till endocrinologist recently!

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Andrea P, Steroid-Induced Cushing’s

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What can you do when the cure might be worse than the disease?

“Have you thought of losing some weight? This would most likely take care of the many complaints you have.” The all too eager yet condescending young intern continued despite my blank stare, “Have you had a sleep study done?”

How many times had I been in this situation? Change the doctor, but keep me there, in the crazy patient’s chair. “Well, the patient has five children, a long history of miscarriages, a fairly recent history of a traumatic abdominal hysterectomy… couple these with the recent death of her father to cancer and basically all normal testing… clearly she’s a depressed, middle aged woman hitting the Ben and Jerry’s a little too much and addicted to Lifetime movies.” Or something like that.

What’s worse than the tiny intern with a huge ego, was the troll under the bridge. I still had to face my PCP who listened to me a little less than a mother who’s heard “Mommy, mommy!” for the hundredth time in an hour, from her 3 year old.

For the better part of two years, I’d seen her for so many things. Each time I’d ask her why my bones were breaking so easily. I told her I was shrinking, to which she replied “It’s impossible to shrink an inch and a half in a year.” Then laughter. I’d ask her why the nausea & vomiting, low oxygen, and migraines were there… all of this was ignored and off to another specialist I’d go (for a similar experience), with more Prednisone in hand. When she didn’t see hardcore proof (i.e. a lab tests or a specialist’s report confirming the symptoms in front of her) the things simply did not exist, despite glaring symptoms.

Another specialist I’d seen did care and did see the disturbing, rapid transformation and accumulation of symptoms, so he sent me to my PCP for testing. I later found out that this specialist feared all along what I had. He had been warning me that Prednisone was dangerous and he hated it. I didn’t. I loved it. It was the only thing that relieved my severe neuropathy pain, the nausea, vomiting and migraines. Without it, I was in the E.R. at least once a week.

I suppose I could cut the PCP some slack and say that every doctor, when they themselves are the young intern, dream about the day when they can show off their seniority and knowledge (let’s not forget power) in front of another young intern. I could say this, but I won’t. Not when I know there are the most wise, sympathetic, world renowned and respected doctors, who’ve been practicing medicine longer than most interns have graced this earth, yet they treat the interns (and patients) as equals. They remain humble.

No, this PCP had no excuse for demeaning me for twenty minutes in front of this man. Alas! She did finally do her job and gave me an exam. It took her less than thirty seconds to blurt out “OMG Andrea! You have Cushing’s Syndrome!” All of the cool was gone. She fumbled with her papers, stuttered, murmured to herself… She was a mess.

andrea-fShe left the room for ten minutes and returned more composed and more… herself. “Andrea, I’m sure you’ve read about Cushing’s Syndrome on the internet.” This sentence was delivered with the same tone and sarcasm as a Disney villain about to pounce on an unsuspecting bunny (or other furry creature… did I mention the “fur” I had sprouted?). She continued, “You have every symptom of Cushing’s Syndrome. The buffalo hump is huge and classic.” She went on about my symptoms. All of which I’d been begging her to look at before this appointment.

By the end of the appointment, she had decided that she’d need to talk to my then rheumatologist; I’d need all sorts of testing, and foremost, “You HAVE to get off of that Prednisone Andrea!” Certainly she knew I wasn’t convinced that her prescriptions of Prednisone were somehow my fault, however the wee intern might have sucked that one up. Perhaps he believed it was my rheumatologist that prescribed all of it; he did do his part as well. They were both in it together.

I left the office miffed and confused. “Well,” I thought, “Let’s go home and see what this Cushing’s is, on the Internet. Probably some sort of psychosomatic disease where you think yourself into the side effects of Prednisone.”

At the point where I began my Internet search, I had changed from an active, really attractive (I can toot my horn, ’cause it ain’t so now) about to be 40 year-old, homeschooling mom of five beautiful children. I was in bed for 3 weeks prior to my PCP appointment. I found out later that my family thought that this was it, I was dying. Indeed, I was close to death and it’s a miracle that I didn’t die.

I had gained 40 lbs. for which easily 10 of it rested on the top of my back. The Buffalo Hump. The rest was hanging out in strange pockets of fat all over my middle and face. I was disoriented and in cold sweats all of the time. Everything hurt.

On the evening of that fateful Friday after my PCP appointment, I joined a Cushing’s support group online. It took me three weeks to compose my introduction post because I had not the energy, nor the wherewithal to finish it. In the meantime however, I found out enough about Steroid Induced Cushing’s Syndrome to know that I was in big trouble.

Every bad side effect one can get from steroid use, I am getting or have. What’s worse is, my adrenal glands have atrophied. They won’t wake up and naturally produce cortisol that our bodies vitally need. Every organ and gland in our body relies on the production of cortisol. When you have Cushing’s, you’re in a real pickle Fred.

With me, I’m continually in either Cushing’s mode or Addison’s mode. Two opposite diseases. You’d be surprised at how many people in the medical field do not understand this. Most disturbing is how many endocrinologists don’t understand it. My body is used to high levels of cortisol so when I try to wean off and my body gets stressed, sick, injured, needs surgery, etc., I go into adrenal insufficiency with the chance of adrenal crisis.

Ahh, adrenal crisis! My nemesis! Is it? Isn’t it? Hospital? Just a Prednisone Boost? These are questions I ask myself daily. I was very near dying during those few weeks before I saw my PCP, because my body was literally shutting down. Again, I’m still amazed that I didn’t die.

Right. I realized for me, a person with autoimmune disease, with all sorts of crazy symptoms, weaning down to a healthy level of cortisol was going to take another miracle. Those message boards? Every time I went to send a personal message to a member that I could relate to in experience, they were dead. Dead. Young women, neglected by so many doctors who thought that they too, were fat and depressed.

Monday came and I called my PCP as scheduled. When she answered the phone she acted as if she didn’t know why I was calling. Before a minute was up, I realized she was getting as far away from admitting I had Cushing’s Syndrome as she could. Both she and my rheumatologist had been prescribing me prednisone without any solid diagnosis (at that point). Basically the Prednisone was completely unwarranted. She told me to wean off of the Prednisone and “Um okay?” then let the silence hang there. I was speechless (and as you’re well aware of at this point, is pretty darn near an oxymoron).

I took it upon myself to see an endocrinologist, who I owe my life to. He ordered a bone density test, a bunch of labs, told me to get a medical alert bracelet ASAP and a whole lot more. He was shocked that none of this had been done.

The bone density test showed that my PCP was half right, I didn’t lose an inch and half off of my stature in less than a year, I had lost two and a half inches. I began a strong osteoporosis medication. A little later, I was put on 5 liters of oxygen at night and as needed during the day, a bi-pap machine and I learned more about cortisol stress doses and began searching for new doctors.

For the next year and a half, I would see a total of 3 more rheumatologists, 5 neurologists and 2 new PCP’s. I was admitted to the hospital too many times to count. I saw 5 more specialists, wasted tons of money, precious time and was demeaned further than I could have ever imagined coming from people who are supposed to “Do no harm.” at one of those big name clinics. Same thing: fat and CrAzY. At the end of it all, I had given up hope. I was on more Prednisone than when I had first seen my endocrinologist.

My teeth had begun rotting because of the calcium loss and my Sjogren’s Syndrome did not help matters there. I had 6 extractions in 3 months and was never able to get back down to the 10 mg. of Prednisone I had begun with. Stress, illness and then having to let the beautiful eyes of our children watch it all…too much.

I saw my endocrinologist for a checkup and he yelled at me. I yelled at him. We both yelled together and then he picked up the phone in front of me and called a few specialists (the most-awesome-est specialists the world has to offer) and made me appointments with them. These doctors graciously took me on as their patient and began working as a team with my endocrinologist to get me off of this Prednisone.

Well, it’s been 8 months since that loud, intense “time of fellowship” with my endocrinologist. Despite the fact that my teeth have deteriorated to the point where I will have them all extracted on Jan. 2, 2014 (Happy New Year!)… and I found out I have both thyroiditis and hyperparathyroidism and well, a bunch of other … stuff. I’m due to wean down to 9 mg. of Prednisone on Thanksgiving day! I’ve lost a little weight. There’s so much to be thankful for!

I have lost much, but what I’ve gained in return, I would never, ever give up. My faith and that of my family’s, has grown in ways that would never have happened had I not gotten this dreadful disease. I found many things. I have found that my husband really means it when he says that I’m beautiful. My children mean it… I have what many have deemed, “The Ugly Disease” yet I feel more beautiful than I ever have. I feel more blessed than I ever have. Most importantly, I remembered and again found my hope, through faith.

Faith is the essence of things hoped for, the evidence of things unseen. When those of us with serious and chronic illness, have no faith in a Hope, we are dead persons walking. Had my endocrinologist not been divinely appointed to verbally kick my butt, there’s no doubt in my mind that I would not be here trying to type this story of mine.

I can’t write nor say a thing without a moral. So the moral of my story is this: know who and what your hope is in. Know what the unseen things are and have fat faith. Take your illness and use it. Use your life! It’s beautiful!

Article reposted with consent of the author from Have Faith: Cushing’s Syndrome

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Joseph (joeysauce), Pituitary Bio

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Hello everyone. My name is Joe. I’m a 23, soon to be 24 year old male who is (hopefully) in remission from ACTH-dependent Cushing’s disease and two transsphenoidal surgeries.

I’d like to say my journey all started back in November of last year. Though, the past year has been a stressful, anxiety filled year for me with a roller coaster of it’s own. I was working full-time as a web designer at a web firm down the block from me for a little over a year, but was just getting so sick of the grind. I was also dating a younger girl for about 2 years up at this point, who had just left for college last August. Thinking that I was finally going to have a little more time to myself to make and save money and just freedom in general, I was proven very wrong. As soon as she left, the separation anxiety hit me like a TON OF BRICKS. I could hardly sleep, go to work, or even function. I knew the first thing I needed to do was free myself of the miserable grind of work and get back to freelance work. I told my job I was leaving and actually had an opportunity to do some other work with my uncle across the country decorating malls for the upcoming holidays as soon as my two weeks approached. It was a nice break and a good way for me to get away and experience some new things, like my girlfriend was doing. When my girlfriend first went away, I started taking Valerian Root to help me sleep and have been taking St. John’s Wart for about a year and a half to keep the anxiety as it’s lowest. I decided that when I get home from this trip, now that I’ll have a MUCH more free life, that I’d like to cut out all these vitamins that I’ve been taking for years to help with my skin, health and anxiety. Like Fish Oil, Vitamin A, E, C, Multivitamins, Probiotics, etc. I wanted to come home and have an awesome natural routine of exercising, working, and juicing. It sounded perfect. Make money, get fit, stay healthy and feel good. As the end of the trip approached, I was pretty much finished with all the vitamins. We traveled for about a month and a half and was home just in time for Thanksgiving. My girlfriend was home then as well, so it was good to see each other again finally. We were in touch as much as we could be when we were both away and decided to keep things going.

Here’s where things started to change. One of the FIRST things my mom said to me when I got home was “Wow, your face looks puffy and swollen.” I actually agreed and said it’s probably this stuff that I decided to stop taking called “hyaluronic acid”. It’s supposed to make your skin more supple and moisturize from the inside out. I figured that’s why my face was looking that way. I JUST started using it too. As the weeks went on, I noticed that there was a prominent redness in my cheeks as well. My cheeks were usually red like this, and I always thought I had Rosacea, but noticed that they were now red the whole day long, and I could almost see where the redness kind of cuts off. I didn’t pay much attention to these signs, but still was a little concerned.

As the holiday’s approached, I didn’t really get a chance to start working out or running or anything that I planned to do now that I was working home. I was gaining a little bit of weight in my face and my tummy, but just blamed it on being lazy. My girlfriend noticed and would tell me that I’m getting chubby and looking different. It was getting pretty annoying at this point hearing everyone saying that I’m puffy and chubby looking. I then started to work out a little and was running as much as I could outside, even though the winter was approaching and it was getting harder and harder to run. I really wasn’t seeing much progress and even started to diet pretty hard with veggies. The crazy part is that I’ve ALWAYS been such a thing HEALTHY person. Always juicing veggies, always drinking water, always taking vitamins, very athletic, etc. It was crazy that I couldn’t get rid of this belly weight or get my face to slim back down.

This is when the weirdest thing happened…The stretch marks. I began to freak out. I saw these ugly purple lines on my inner thighs and was really confused. I thought…”How can someone my size get marks like this…am I exercising too much?” This was around February, and my girlfriend came home on another break and I remember one morning her mother made a comment and said “Wow, your face is so puffy and red, maybe you’re allergic to something, you look so different” This is when I finally decided that I needed to see a doctor. I decided to see an allergist to figure out why my face is so red and bloated looking. We did all kinds of allergy tests just to find out that I’m allergic to most environmental allergens. In between visits, I was doing my research. I started to Google things like “stretch marks inner thighs” and eventually came across the word “Cortisol”. Then Googling Cortisol, I eventually came across “Cushings”. I started to read the symptoms and began to notice that the majority of them were exactly what I had. The “moon face”, the “striae”, the “central obesity”. Then I realized how bad my sleep was over the passed few months. I thought it was just me being anxious about work, because I would wake up VERY early in the morning and wouldn’t be able to fall back asleep, so I would just get up and make breakfast and hop on the computer. Then I remembered the headaches I’ve been getting, or how tired during the afternoon I’d be. I was starting to make sense.

So one of the visits with allergist, I figured I’d mention the research I was doing. I asked the doctor if he was familiar with the disease. He said he definitely is. I showed him how different I looked a few months ago, and showed him my stretch marks. He was pretty shocked to see, but said it could just be from just eating bad and not exercising enough. I asked him if he could get me a blood test to check my Cortisol anyway. He said absolutely and sent me to a lab a few blocks away. I was very much expecting to see high cortisol levels. Like a fool, I went right after my appt with him, so the blood was taken around 12PM. I didn’t realize then that cortisol should be drawn around 8AM, but anyway…

The next time I came in to see him, he gave me the results. He said “You wanted to know if your Cortisol was low, right?” I said “No, I wanted to know if it is high.” He said “Oh…well, yes, they are a bit high.” He did mention that the RX said for me to have them taken in the morning and was kind of mad that the nurse didn’t notice that and say to come back in the morning. He said they could be high because of the time of the day and maybe the stress because of what I thought was going on. I knew now that I had to take these results to an endo.

This is when I started to mention things to my parents. They knew I was seeing the allergist and I have already talked to them about the cortisol and cushings, but I didn’t really get in depth. Once I had this blood taken, I knew I had to let them know what I think is really going on. I explained that the disease is caused by a tumor in the brain, or in your adrenal glands and they thought I was talking crazy. I was looking for local endos and found one not too far from me. When me and my mother first met with him, I knew instantly I wasn’t going to like him. It seemed I had to introduce myself before he even said anything. When I explained what I thought was going on, having Cushing’s and all, he said “You don’t look suspicious of Cushings at all.” He mentioned that the disease is VERY rare and that he has only diagnosed it about two times in his career. He looked my stomach, the back of my neck and said that when people have moon face, you usually see fatty deposits by the side of their eyes. As much as I didn’t want to hear I have Cushings, I wanted a solid answer to what is going on. He didn’t even ask to see the stretch marks when I mentioned them. He said, “Yes your cortisol is high, so we will do further testing.” I took home the urine test and also had a few blood tests done. Very anxious at this point, a few days passed and we came to see him again. Just as I thought, very high cortisol levels. He seemed very shocked and pretty much stated that Yes, I do have Cushings. He then wrote up multiple RXs for me to have done. An MRI, a CT scan, a chest scan. I was beginning to get pretty nervous. He explained how the disease is very complicated to diagnose and to find where the excess cortisol is coming from exactly. I was becoming very knowledgeable at this point and knew it wasn’t going to be an easy process.

Things started to get a little ‘different’ around the house and with my relationships. I’m actually a triplet and 1 of 3 children. My brother and I are very close, but not so much with my sister. My brother knew what was going on, but didn’t really know much about the disease. I would tell him and explain to him, but not really sure if he was even listening much. My dad was starting to get involved with things and becoming supportive of the changes. I was getting depressed with how I look and felt, and thankful my girlfriend was still away, even though I could’ve used her support…I just didn’t want her to see me like this. Things started to become pretty stale with her and my health was becoming more of a priority. I told her what was going on, but she hardly understood. So I started with the CT scan.

The doctor suspected the tumor to be found my in adrenal glands. Unfortunately, there was nothing to be found. The doctor then took some more blood work and realized that we should be looking in the pitutary. I then had an MRI done. At this time I receiving help from the whole family. My aunts and uncles were doing some research too, looking for better doctors. We live on Long Island, New York…so Manhattan is just a small trip away. It’s said that the best doctors around here are located in NYC. My mom found an endo by the name of Eliza Geer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. We were lucky enough to get a appt rather quickly. We were still waiting on the results of the MRI at this point and recieved them the day of the appointment.

We took them to Dr. Geer. Now this Dr. is no ordinary endo. She actually is VERY familiar with the disease and runs a research study on Cushing’s on “Body Composition and Metabolism” in Cushings patients. Immediately, we knew were at the right place. She took a look at all the blood work and could most definitely tell that what is going on is definitely Cushings. She was very impressed with me that I was able to basically diagnose myself, and asked me if I was studying in the medical field, hah. She knew that there was no need for more testing, but now just to figure out the source. We gave her the CD with the MRI results but she had trouble getting the images to show up on her computer. She asked that if we could wait a bit longer, that we could meet the neurosurgeon that she works with, Dr. Kalmon Post, and we would look at the imaging together in his office. Feeling pretty good about the new doctor, we waited a bit in the lobby until they could both see me again. During the wait, I dozed off, but woke up to my mother and aunt talking to a lady in the lobby. She was with her son. After some conversation with her, they found out that he also had Cushings, and has been going through it for several years. He is 20, so a few years younger than me. My aunt asked if it was okay to exchange emails, so me and him have actually been in touch since our surgeries.

Anyway, it was finally time to meet both doctors. Feeling very nervous and anxious, we sat with them and he explained a little more about the disease, and the complications of the surgery, etc. He made a joke about my rosy cheeks and it actually made me feel a bit comfortable with him. He also said how the reversal of the symptoms almost seem magical. I was beginning to feel really good about him as well. He said that he does pituitary surgeries multiple times a week. He then opened the CD and we all looked at the images together. He explained that when there is a distinct tumor found, you will see it quite easily and explained how it would make the gland look in the scan. Unfortunately…we couldn’t find anything. He explained that at this point it could so small that it may never show up on the scan, so he never wants to go into the gland and begin any sort of surgery without being 100% positive that this is the source of the problem. He then explained that there is procedure that completely confirms where the source is…”Inferior petrosal sinus sampling” It sounded pretty strange to me, but I knew it had to be done. As soon as we left his office, we made an appt with Dr. Patel to have the IPSS done ASAP.

A week later we were back for the procedure. What a strange procedure…but all went well. The results came back telling Dr. Post that it’s time for surgery. I think it was another week or so later that we made the appt for my first surgery on May 6th 2013. Both anxious and excited, I was more that ready to get this done and over with. My surgery was late in the day, so I wasn’t in recovery until I think about 6pm and then in my hospital bed until about 8pm. I remember my endo coming to see how I was feeling, as well as my surgeon. Knowing that I was supposed to be feeling flu-like symptoms, I was honest and said that I felt okay. My parents spent the next few hours with me until they had to leave. Unfortunatly, I was not feeling any sort of crash, but just very uncomfortable from the darn nasal-tampon in my nose. The next day the blood results came back from after the surgery and my cortisol levels were still very high. Disappointing news, but pretty much expected. I think they were 77. Though, the doctors mentioned that a second surgery is common and that the levels may be high because of the time of the day. We still kept our fingers crossed that they would still be dropping over the next day. They did come down ALOT the next day, but not in a normal range. I was sent home on the Hydrocortisone, incase that they would continue to drop, though I wasn’t very optimistic at this point. The pathology report did come back that whatever he did remove was all tumor, so that was good to hear.

Still feeling the Cushing-like symptoms over the next few days, I took my week later blood work again just to find out that the cortisol levels went back up. My endo said that I am going to need another surgery. I remember my surgeon explaining how he wants to be as gentle as possible when messing around with my pituitary, to make sure no damage is done to it. So I understood that maybe there is some tumor cells left behind and this time he will get the job done. We were lucky enough to schedule the second surgery only about a week or so later, with a very early appointment (May 20th).

Right before the surgery, the surgeon came to me and my mother and mentioned “Hyperplasia”. He said it’s very rare, but there is a chance that my gland is what’s producing the excess ACTH and not a tumor. He said is going to try his best to determine that and continue to remove any abnormalities he see, as aggressively as he thinks he needs to be. A few hours later, waking up in recovery I felt crazy anxious. I couldn’t stand the oxygen mask so I removed that after a few minutes. I could not wait to be in my bed. Unfortunately, again, I was not feeling the crash. Disappointed again, we were giving it time and hoping again that there were just a delay in the levels dropping. The next two days passed, and my levels were still a bit high. I saw both my surgeon and endo before leaving the hospital, and we spoke about other treatments at this point, but obviously we were going to wait on the near future cortisol results before moving forward with anything else. Me and my family were pretty devastated at this point, but my parents were still being optimistic. Not able to understand how this “amazing” doctor was having a hard time curing me and why it has to be so complicated for me was beyond everyone at this point. Sent home with HC again, everyone was praying for a drop in the cortisol levels. My doctor had me get my blood taken that following Friday with STAT on it. I spent most of that day with anxiety attacks and tears, over the fact that I just didn’t know if I was cured or not. I was feeling pretty dizzy and sick to stomach…but didn’t really noticed that UNTIL…

I received a call later that day from my endo. She first asked me how I was feeling. I told her very anxious and pretty dizzy. She responded with “Good! Because your results came back and your cortisol is at 12.” My parents both jumped up (I was laying in their bed between them…yes, I felt that awful about everything going on) in shock and awe. I was shocked to hear good news for once. She said to continue the HC and that we will be doing follow up bloodwork in about a week. The next blood test approached, with prayers that it would be even lower or at least hopefully in a normal range. This time the levels were a LITTLE raised, to 18…so my doctor felt that at this time we can begin to taper the medication since my levels are indeed high, yet still in a normal range. At this point, we believed that I am in remission and on my way to recovery.

A week later, we went for the two week follow up with both the surgeon and endo. We were able to meet with both of them at the same time. Both doctors said that I am starting to look less cushing-oid, which was relieving to hear. My endo explained that because of the surgery, my Thyroid and Testosterone levels are also a bit low, and that I’d have to go on replacement until both levels are normalized. I figured that this follow up would only be to talk and go over a few things, with not any real results or new good news, but I was okay with that. Though, we did have an interesting conversation with the surgeon.

Dr. Post, the surgeon wanted to explain what was going on with this pathology report. He is known to be one of the top neurosurgeons in the country and has done thousands of pituitary surgeries. He said that I seem to be a very perplexed case of Cushings. From what he can see when he performed the surgery is that the abnormalities do NOT look like tumor cells, but that the pathologist insists that what they look like to them ARE tumor cells. Because of the confusion, he is having my pathology report results sent out to other surgeons and pathologist for further questioning. At this point, he feels that the abnormalities that he removed are indeed abnormal pituitary cells, or Hyperplasia, like he explained to me and my mother before performing the second surgery. From how it sounded to me and my parents, that treatment for Hyperplasia is pretty much the same and that if all of the abnormalities have been removed, then I should be cured. He did also say that during the second surgery, he removed a lot more abnormal cells than he did the first time. Knowing that I perplexed one of the best surgeons in the country, we all felt a bit confused and a little down about things. We spent the rest of the day in Manhattan and headed home trying to keep our chins up.

Well, today I think has been about 2 weeks from the follow up, and almost a month from surgery. I’d like to say that I am seeing changes with my face, but it’s really hard to tell, though everyone around me is saying that I look fantastic. I can’t seem to get rid of the awful bloat belly, though. I have been going to the gym with my cousin for a week or so now, since my body has been feeling ALOT Bbtter than it has the passed couple months.

Last week my endo was away for the week, and being that I have been feeling better, she decided to give me the week off from blood work, which was relieving. I finally received my Thyroid RX yesterday and began it today and will be getting the Testosterone tomorrow. I got a call from my endo today and she is having me get blood work for my cortisol this Thursday. I am praying everything is normal and that I can continue to ween off the HC even more. I’d also like to mention that I going to see a laser dermatologist tomorrow for a consultation to see what can be done about the hideous stretch marks that my legs are covered in.

So it seems at this point I still am not 100% positive that I am in remission and this Thursday’s results should give us a pretty definite idea. I think this just about covers everything you guys need to know about me and my journey and battle with Cushings. I’m sure there’s so much I left out, though I am sorry it’s such a long introduction. I do feel my story is quite unique, being that I basically diagnosed myself and caught the symptoms so quickly. Please, if anyone has any questions or anything they’d like to discuss, PLEASE feel free to post back. It looks me DAYS to finish this and about 6 drafts that I started over a month ago when I was going to introduce myself to you guys before my surgeries…just was never able to bring myself to finish.

Contact Joseph

Joseph may be interviewed in an upcoming BlogTalkRadio show.

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