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Jules, Pituitary Bio

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golden-oldie

 

Originally from September 25, 2008

My journey with Cushing’s started six years ago at the age of ten. It started when I developed a duodenal ulcer. It was unbearably painful (this is coming from someone with a very high pain tolerance) and I have extreme stomach problems for at least 4 years following. I went to a gastroenterologist and got it somewhat under control.

This went on until the age of almost 15 when I just couldn’t take it anymore. By this time I had struggled with a very mentally draining family issue that had occurred. I became very irritable and depressed and just assumed it was from this hard period of my life.

I was shocked one day to see purple stretch marks running down my abdomen. I had been rapidly gaining weight and associated them with that. Always being an average size girl this weight gain both freaked me out and made me even more depressed. I was very irritable and unhappy with myself. I don’t overeat and am pretty active being an equestrian rider and working out at least twice a week. It made no sense. I knew something was wrong but had no idea what. My face has always been round but lately it was larger and red.

I decided to go to a new gastro. and was suprised when he felt the base of my neck and told me my thyroid was very enlarged. He quickly referred me to an endocrinologist who diagnosed me with hypothyroidism. I though I’d finally found the answer and expected my new medication to solve my problems.

To my dismay the symptoms only got worse. I was also now noticing fatigue and weakness.I gained 25 pounds that year when I should have been losing it after starting the medication. I was starting to get thirsty and drink all the time. I urinated frequently and sometimes had leakage. My periods from day one were very intense and I had horrible PMS but now they were becoming very weird and I am starting to lose them. I have sweet cravings several times a day and if I miss a meal by an hour I get an intense headache sometimes accompanied be nausea. It is now difficult for me to concentrate on schoolwork and I am extremely fatigued. I can’t bend my joints for long before they tighten and ache. I can no longer bend over without having bad pains when I straighten up again. Some nights I have an awful time trying to sleep and I feel as if life is growing harder and harder by the day.

After dealing with this endocrinologist for a year and having him ignore my other symptoms by telling me that my thyroid levels were normal I couldn’t take it anymore. I knew I was very sick deep inside.

I scheduled an appointment with my now lifesaver. My first appointment with Dr.Borg was the best day of my life. He did a full body exam (which the other doctor hadn’t) and immediately told me that I looked like a person with Cushing’s disease. He was completely shocked when I told him that the other doctor hadn’t tested or looked at anything other than my thyroid.

Advice to anyone who might have this disease is to insist that your endocrinologist runs as many blood tests possible and make sure they do a physical exam. This is what I think “saved my life”. I was told by my new doctor that I would have developed type 1 diabetes within 3 years.

After the tests showed that my levels were way off I had an MRI which confirmed a tumor. I should now say that the best day of my life was when he told me that the MRI showed that I had a tumor and this was very fixable. I was so relieved. Now I am seeing a neurosurgeon and am awaiting news of when my surgery is. What I would like to say to anyone struggling with this disease is listen to yourself over anyone else. I had countless doctors tell me that I needed to eat less and work out more.

Deep down inside I knew there was a reason for my weight gain and for the hurt I lived with everyday. I knew that life was better than this. I pushed my parents to bring me to as many doctors as it took until we found the one who could find the culprit. You are the only one who knows how you are really feeling. I know it’s hard but hang in there and know that there is a light at the end of that dark tunnel.

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Lynn M, Adrenal BIo

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golden-oldie

Hi everyone!

My name is Lynn M. I am a 39 year old with adrenal Cushing’s. My left adrenal gland was removed on Nov 29, 2000, in Portland Or. 24 hours after surgery, I went into adrenal crisis and was in a crisis for three days due to sodium and potassium crash.

My tumor had been present for about 5 years but it took three years of different doctors to diagnose me with Cushing’s. Now one year post op I have lost 45 lbs on weight watchers but still taking 35mg of cortef and 50 mg potassium and diabetic. My other glands have not started to function yet now I am at home recovering from ankle surgery scared to death of infection or not healing because of the steroids…Has anyone else had surgery while still on high doses of cortef?

Please help me with any info you can…Thanks Lynn

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Kayla, Pituitary Bio

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pituitary

 

well I’m 21 years old i have had a pituitary tumor and addisons for almost 4 years.

Then last year my doctor took me off my addiosns med for no reason and now i am being diagnosed with cushing and its very hard for me because my doctor doesn’t know how to treat me and I’m very frustrated and scared.

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Joslyn (Joslyn), Adrenal Bio

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golden-oldie

 

Originally posted Monday, June 8, 2009

 

I’m 25 years old and was diagnosed last week with cushings syndrome.

I’m one of the lucky 1% and I do mean lucky since it’s curable, to have a a tumor on my adrenal. I never thought I’d be so happy to hear “you have a tumor”

I have surgery schgeduled for 7/6. I’m quite scared but excited.

She was interviewed in the Cushings Help Voice Chat / Podcast series after her surgery.
Listen to Joslyn’s interview.

 

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Barbara (2maro), Pituitary Bio

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golden-oldie

 

After being told for ten years that all of my “problems” would just go away if I “lost a little weight, I fell and hit my head on my fireplace hearth requiring several stitches.

When it was time for them to be removed, I went to my new Internal med Dr. to have that done and ask if I was having a reaction to one of my meds as my face seemed swollen.

She had seen one case of Cushings in it’s recovery phase, but had studied to help that patient. She suspect, tested and diagnosed with me with Cushings in December of 2001.

I spent the next few months searching the net, reading this site and going through testing to determine the origin of my disease, and ended up at MD Anderson with Dr. McCutcheon who removed the pituitary tumor transphenoidally.

Miraculously, over the next 9 months, I lost 100 pounds. I am no longer diabetic and did not have high blood pressure until 2008. I continued to lose until my Internal med doc actually told me I needed to put weight back on. By 2008, my pituitary function had pretty much ceased, and I am now on replacement hydrocortison, synthroid and human growth hormone. I turned 50 this year, and I feel very reborn.

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Erin T, Pituitary Bio

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pituitary-location

 

After six years of trying to get pregnant I finally decided to see an endocrinologist who suggested I might have a tumor on my adrenal glands and prescribed by bromocriptine to make it shrink. Two years later I was able to carry a pregnancy to term and delivered a healthy baby girl. After delivery I was never able to breast feed, kept gaining weight, had horrible stretch marks and odd bruising.

One year later I still had not had my period so I went to my OB-GYN. She shot me full of progesterone and estrogen, which did nothing so I went back to the endocrinologist. That day my BP was 173/121 and I weighed 180lbs (I’m 5’4″).

On first sight he diagnosed me with Cushing’s Syndrome and after a series of tests over many months it was confirmed.

On November 25, 2011 I had surgery to remove the macro adenoma that had completely consumed my pituitary gland. Ever since then my immune system has been weak and I’m tired all the time. Despite losing weight and exercising and eating right I just can’t seem to feel good.

I take .88 Levothyroxine, 2.5 prednisone, 2 doses of desmopressin and hormone replacement. Most days I wish I had never had the surgery. But, through it all I have done my best to live.

6 weeks after my surgery I went back to grad school and graduated on-time with honors, but since then I haven’t been able to keep a job outside of the home because I get sick if someone sneezes within 100 yards of me, and lets not even talk about the stomach bug.

I’ve been hospitalized twice and now carry injections of dexomethozine and anti-nausea meds with me everywhere I go. I’ve told my doctor about my fatigue and he refuses to prescribe Growth Hormone, but I’ve learned to suffer through it.

 

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Donelle T, Pituitary Bio

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Donelle Trotman was only in his 30s when his health suddenly took a strange and frightening turn.

He was rapidly gaining weight — more than 100 pounds in one year. His upper torso was getting bigger, but not his legs. And he felt overwhelmingly tired.

“My body just started changing,” the Staten Island, New York, native told TODAY as part of a three-day series, “Medical Mysteries,” looking at people who have recovered from rare diseases.

It was especially puzzling because Trotman had never had weight issues before.

In school, Trotman was never a skinny kid, but he wasn’t overweight. He loved sports, playing both basketball and baseball.

So as he entered adulthood, he was active and in good shape. Then, three years ago, he suddenly began to gain weight.

“It was just specific places: My stomach, under my arms, my back of my neck, my face, the bottom of my back,” Trotman said. “My legs stayed the same for a long time.”

To lose the extra pounds, Trotman began running, working out and lifting weights. Nothing worked.

In the span of one year, Trotman gained more than 120 pounds, topping the scale at 366 pounds, twice the amount he weighed at 18.

“I doubled, like, I got a whole person on me,” he said.

There were other alarming changes. Trotman became so easily tired that he’d get out of breath just by chewing food. When he woke up seeing double three months ago, he knew it was time to go to the hospital.

Doctors ran a flurry of tests, but the results offered few clues, leaving everyone puzzled. Then one day, an intern noticed stretch marks all over Trotman’s body, a telltale sign that solved the mystery. Trotman had Cushing’s disease, a rare condition that affects fewer than 50,000 people in the U.S. every year.

Trotman’s weight gain was being caused by a tiny tumor at the base of his brain, prompting his body to produce too much of the hormone cortisol. He had some of the classic symptoms: major weight gain in his upper body, skin problems and acne, plus fatigue.

Dr. John Boockvar and Dr. Peter Costantino at New York’s Lenox Hill Hospital discovered Trotman had steroid levels ten times higher than normal.

“In Cushing’s disease, the pituitary gland has a small growth that releases a single hormone that causes the body to live with very high levels of steroids. The skin becomes very thin. You get increased acne. You can grow hair. You start sweating. You gain a lot of fat,” Boockvar said.

There was no time to lose: Untreated, Cushing’s is a fatal disease. Trotman was getting close to the point where doctors would not be able to reverse the changes, Costantino noted. He underwent surgery two weeks ago and had the growth successfully removed.

“The tumor was no bigger than the size of the tip of my pen,” Boockvar said. “And that something so small can cause a man to grow to 350 pounds and absolutely destroy his life is rather remarkable.”

These days, Trotman is feeling much better. His main focus now is to lose the weight he gained and regain an active lifestyle. He hopes to play basketball with his son soon.

“It’s wonderful. Every day it’s just like I feel a little stronger,” he said.

Doctors say Trotman will continue to lose weight and can shoot hoops with his son in about three months. There is an 8-10 percent chance the disease could come back, but Trotman said he knows what to look for now.

One of the reasons Trotman wanted to share his story is so others might recognize the symptoms of Cushing’s, although doctors stress it is a very rare illness.

From http://www.today.com/health/after-gaining-120-pounds-1-year-rare-diagnosis-saves-mans-t6561

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