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MaryO, 31st Pituitary Surgery Anniversary

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Today is the 31st anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 31 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.

Last year I went back on it (Omnitrope this time) in late June.  Hooray!  I still don’t know if it’s going to work but I have high hopes.  I am posting some of how that’s going here.

During nephrectomy, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last couple years, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my cortisol use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.  September 12, 2018 I did get that knee injection (Kenalog)  and it’s been one of the best things I ever did.  I’m not looking forward to telling my endo!

I also developed an allergy to blackberries in October and had to take Prednisone – and I’ll have to tell my endo that, too!

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on this blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.  Unfortunately, Dr. Oldfield died in the last year.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days here at http://www.maryo.co/

 

Patty, Pituitary Bio

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April is Cushing’s Disease Awareness Month. I would like to help raise public awareness about this debilitating illness. It is so misunderstood by most medical professionals that their patients often suffer for many years without a correct diagnosis and, in far too many cases, never get a diagnosis at all.

I personally suffered from a common list of Cushing’s symptoms for years. I sought help from medical professionals and was told nothing medically was wrong with me other than I was menopausal and needed to lose weight.

I gained 70 pounds in a short amount of time due to a tiny tumor in my pituitary gland which was overproducing the hormone ACTH, causing Cushing’s.

Besides rapid weight gain, my forearms bruised. I had a red face and neck, grew a hump on the back of my neck. My belly swelled to pregnancy size. I had high blood pressure.

No matter what I ate, how much I worked out, or how much I explained to everyone around me that I was not doing this to myself, no one believed me. I went about five years not sure what I would do because my body was slowly breaking down and was in really bad health.

In 2016 my back went out and I needed surgery. I was at a followup visit with a PA when he asked if I knew why I blew my back out.

Desperate, I got emotional and told him my story. I told him I thought I had Cushing’s disease based on my own internet research. He was the first person to listen to me and gave me a referral to see an endocrinologist. The endocrinologist took one look at me and knew without testing, although we did test and it was confirmed.

I met with my neurosurgeon and ENT and had surgery June 2017 to remove a 1 centimeter pituitary tumor, which lies at the base of your brain. I will forever be grateful to the team of doctors who saved my life and also to the PA who listened to me.

Life is slowly getting back to normal (or my new normal, I should say.)

Shared from https://www.thecamarilloacorn.com/articles/disease-may-be-hard-to-diagnose/

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MaryO: Giving Thanks for 30 Years

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Today is the 30th anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 30 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.  Even when I got to 10 years NED (no evidence of disease) from cancer, I couldn’t go back on the GH.

However, this year I went back on it (Omnitrope this time) in late June.  Hooray!  I still don’t know if it’s going to work but I have high hopes.  I am posting some of how that’s going here.

During that surgery, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last couple years, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my cortisol use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on this blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.  Unfortunately, Dr. Oldfield died a couple months ago.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days here at http://www.maryo.co/

 

In Memory: Dr. Edward Hudson Oldfield, September 1, 2017

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Dr. Oldfield was MaryO’s surgeon at the NIH November 3, 1987.  This was back in the olden days of transsphenoidal surgery.  I honestly expected to die but this man saved my life.

Dr. Edward Hudson Oldfield quietly passed away at home in Charlottesville, Virginia, surrounded by his family on September 1, 2017.

Born on November 22, 1947, in Mt. Sterling Kentucky, he was the son of Ellis Hudson Oldfield and Amanda Carolyn Oldfield. Ed is survived by his wife of 43 years, Susan Wachs Oldfield; a daughter, Caroline Talbott Oldfield; three siblings, Richard Oldfield of Mt. Sterling, Ky., Brenda Oldfield of Lexington, Ky., and Joseph Oldfield (Brenda) of Morehead, Ky.; nieces, Adrienne Petrocelli (Phil) of Cincinnati, Ohio and Keri Utterback (Brad) and nephew, Gabe Oldfield, both of Mt Sterling. His parents and a sister, Bonnie Lee Cherry, predeceased him.

Dr. Oldfield attended the University of Kentucky and graduated from the UK Medical School. He completed two years of surgical residency at Vanderbilt University and spent a year in Neurology at the National Hospital for Nervous Disease in London, England, before completing his neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt University. After a year in private practice in Lexington, he completed a two-year fellowship at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

In 1984, he was named Chief of the Clinical Neurosurgery Section at NINDS and from 1986-2007, he was the Chief of the Surgical Neurology Branch at NIH. He joined the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Virginia in 2007 where he held the Crutchfield Chair in Neurosurgery and was a Professor of Neurosurgery and Internal Medicine.

He led multidisciplinary efforts in the treatment of pituitary tumors and contributed to the research program in Neurosurgery at UVA. He often said it did not feel he was going to work because he so enjoyed every aspect of his career.

Dr. Oldfield was the author of over 500 original scientific and clinical contributions to medical literature and the co-inventor of patents on convection-enhanced drug delivery and genetic therapy. He served on the editorial boards of Neurosurgery and the Journal of Neurosurgery, where he completed a term of eight years as associate editor. Dr. Oldfield served as vice president and president of the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS). He received numerous awards including: the Public Health Superior Service Award; the Grass Medal for Meritorious Research in Neurological Science; the Farber Award; the Distinguished Alumnus Award, University of Kentucky Medical Alumni Association; the Harvey Cushing Medal; and the first annual AANS Cushing Award for Technical Excellence and Innovation in Neurosurgery.

In 2015 he received the Charles B. Wilson Award for “career achievement and substantial contributions to understanding and treatment of brain tumors”. A man of many interests and endless curiosity, Ed found joy in exploring the world around him with a great appetite for adventure, as long as it included variety and history. He preferred outdoor activities, and throughout his life enjoyed hiking, bird watching, photography and especially fly fishing, which provided the kind of peace he treasured in his limited free time. Learning was a priority in every activity. Ed was interested in genealogy and maintained a precise record of his family history, spending over a decade accumulating and scanning family photographs. It was important to him to know from where and whom his family originated. Though he loved to watch sports, especially the UK Wildcats, he did not always follow a particular team he cheered for the underdog.

His love of music was vast, from Arthur Alexander, Etta James, John Prine, Luciano Pavarotti, Van Morrison and Iris Dement, to name a few favorites. Friends and colleagues remember his gentle southern voice, particularly in his advice, “All you have to do is the right thing; everything else will take care of itself.” His family will remember him loving Shakespeare productions, a good barbecue sandwich, Ruth Hunt candy bars, a warm fireplace at Christmas and several beloved dogs.

A Memorial service was held on Monday, September 25, 2017, at the University of Virginia Alumni Hall at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to Edmond J. Safra Family Lodge at National Institutes of Health, Hospice of the Piedmont, or Piedmont Environmental Council.

From http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/oldfield-dr-edward-hudson/article_3bb9df83-d223-5d26-81f4-cfd4565ee0c6.html

Crystal (Crystal), Pituitary Bio

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Hi, my name is Crystal and I’m new. I’m a 35 yr.old mother of a 5 yr. old with more energy in her little pinky than I have in an entire day and I’m married to an amazing man, who makes living with this possible.

I was finally diagnosed with Cushing’s Disease (excreting pituitary tumor). In April 2017. I had the typical doctor who didn’t believe me so I took it into my own hands and figured out what I thought was going on….Cushings without a doubt in my mind.

So I went to a naturopath and asked her to order me a 24 hr. urine test and when she got it she said I need to go to an endo asap. I had already made appointments with two, one being at OHSU in Oregon with one of the best pit. teams in the US. I only live 2 hrs. away and am sooo lucky for that. I know many people have to travel much further to get the best healthcare for this.

Anyways, the endo I saw in Portland looked at me and immediately and said I had a very cushoid appearance and that we needed to do about 6 tests in the next two weeks. I did the tests, then had to do an MRI, which showed a 5×4 tumor in my pituitary gland, next was an IPSS to make sure it was 100% pituitary and not ectopic coming from somewhere else in my body. Once this was all confirmed I was scheduled for surgery in June.

As my surgery date approached, my symptoms got significantly worse and I finally called my endo to tell them. The nurse told me I had to deal with it until surgery and that there was nothing tI could do about my symptoms. Within 5 minutes of hanging up the assistant to the neurosurgeon called and told me surgery was being moved to the following week which was four days away. I had the transsphenoidal surgery about 6 weeks ago and my cortisol dropped to 0.6 in less than 24 hours after surgery. The neurosurgeon said I was technically in remission and although I’m happy, it seems to good to be true after the last couple years I’ve had. I came to this site looking for information on recovery. I know everyone is different and I was warned a little bit about it, but I’m pretty miserable and very curious how others recoveries are going.

Thanks, glad to be here. Crystal

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Jules, Pituitary Bio

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golden-oldie

 

Originally from September 25, 2008

My journey with Cushing’s started six years ago at the age of ten. It started when I developed a duodenal ulcer. It was unbearably painful (this is coming from someone with a very high pain tolerance) and I have extreme stomach problems for at least 4 years following. I went to a gastroenterologist and got it somewhat under control.

This went on until the age of almost 15 when I just couldn’t take it anymore. By this time I had struggled with a very mentally draining family issue that had occurred. I became very irritable and depressed and just assumed it was from this hard period of my life.

I was shocked one day to see purple stretch marks running down my abdomen. I had been rapidly gaining weight and associated them with that. Always being an average size girl this weight gain both freaked me out and made me even more depressed. I was very irritable and unhappy with myself. I don’t overeat and am pretty active being an equestrian rider and working out at least twice a week. It made no sense. I knew something was wrong but had no idea what. My face has always been round but lately it was larger and red.

I decided to go to a new gastro. and was suprised when he felt the base of my neck and told me my thyroid was very enlarged. He quickly referred me to an endocrinologist who diagnosed me with hypothyroidism. I though I’d finally found the answer and expected my new medication to solve my problems.

To my dismay the symptoms only got worse. I was also now noticing fatigue and weakness.I gained 25 pounds that year when I should have been losing it after starting the medication. I was starting to get thirsty and drink all the time. I urinated frequently and sometimes had leakage. My periods from day one were very intense and I had horrible PMS but now they were becoming very weird and I am starting to lose them. I have sweet cravings several times a day and if I miss a meal by an hour I get an intense headache sometimes accompanied be nausea. It is now difficult for me to concentrate on schoolwork and I am extremely fatigued. I can’t bend my joints for long before they tighten and ache. I can no longer bend over without having bad pains when I straighten up again. Some nights I have an awful time trying to sleep and I feel as if life is growing harder and harder by the day.

After dealing with this endocrinologist for a year and having him ignore my other symptoms by telling me that my thyroid levels were normal I couldn’t take it anymore. I knew I was very sick deep inside.

I scheduled an appointment with my now lifesaver. My first appointment with Dr.Borg was the best day of my life. He did a full body exam (which the other doctor hadn’t) and immediately told me that I looked like a person with Cushing’s disease. He was completely shocked when I told him that the other doctor hadn’t tested or looked at anything other than my thyroid.

Advice to anyone who might have this disease is to insist that your endocrinologist runs as many blood tests possible and make sure they do a physical exam. This is what I think “saved my life”. I was told by my new doctor that I would have developed type 1 diabetes within 3 years.

After the tests showed that my levels were way off I had an MRI which confirmed a tumor. I should now say that the best day of my life was when he told me that the MRI showed that I had a tumor and this was very fixable. I was so relieved. Now I am seeing a neurosurgeon and am awaiting news of when my surgery is. What I would like to say to anyone struggling with this disease is listen to yourself over anyone else. I had countless doctors tell me that I needed to eat less and work out more.

Deep down inside I knew there was a reason for my weight gain and for the hurt I lived with everyday. I knew that life was better than this. I pushed my parents to bring me to as many doctors as it took until we found the one who could find the culprit. You are the only one who knows how you are really feeling. I know it’s hard but hang in there and know that there is a light at the end of that dark tunnel.

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Kathleen (ForegoneLegacy), Pituitary Bio

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golden-oldie

 

Originally posted November 20, 2008

Hi, my name is Kathleen. I’m 24 years old and live in southern pa.

I had my two pituitary tumors removed 8/22/08 and I’m still not feeling any better really.

Over the last decade I have been diagnosed with cushings, Lyme, lupus, endometriosis, sinus
tachycardia, fibromyalgia, arthritis, asthma, the list seems to go on and on.

And I guess I had it in my head that once I had this surgery that I would magically get better and move on with my life – go to college, get an apartment, get my license, and hopefully lose all the weight so maybe one day I could be confident enough to start dating again.

Its been nearly 3 months and I seem to be losing hope. My neurosurgeon says that the pathology reports showed “essentially” nothing (still not sure what that means) and that he doesn’t need to see me again.

The ENT who did the surgery was wonderful but can’t really help with anything but making my
nose/sinuses/gums ok. 🙂 And endocrinologists – I have been seeing them for ten years, and never met one whom I liked or who was helpful. Right now I’m getting a full cardio workup to try to fix my weird rhythm.

All of this is being done at Georgetown in D.C, but I’ve been all over the east coast. I don’t know, I guess I hoped maybe you’d have some insight or hopefulness to latch on – cause I put all my eggs in this basket and I feel like I’m about to drop the basket.

Thanks for listening,
Kathleen

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