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MaryO, 32nd Pituitary Surgery Anniversary

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Today is the 32nd anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 31 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.

Last year I went back on it (Omnitrope this time) in late June.  Hooray!  I still don’t know if it’s going to work but I have high hopes.  I am posting some of how that’s going here.

During nephrectomy, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last couple years, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my cortisol use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.  September 12, 2018 I did get that knee injection (Kenalog)  and it’s been one of the best things I ever did.  I didn’t look forward to telling my endo!  I have had a couple more injections.

I also developed an allergy to blackberries in October and had to take Prednisone – and I had to tell my endo that, too!

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on this blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.  Unfortunately, Dr. Oldfield died.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days here at http://www.maryo.co/

 

MaryO, 31st Pituitary Surgery Anniversary

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Today is the 31st anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 31 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.

Last year I went back on it (Omnitrope this time) in late June.  Hooray!  I still don’t know if it’s going to work but I have high hopes.  I am posting some of how that’s going here.

During nephrectomy, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last couple years, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my cortisol use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.  September 12, 2018 I did get that knee injection (Kenalog)  and it’s been one of the best things I ever did.  I’m not looking forward to telling my endo!

I also developed an allergy to blackberries in October and had to take Prednisone – and I’ll have to tell my endo that, too!

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on this blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.  Unfortunately, Dr. Oldfield died in the last year.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days here at http://www.maryo.co/

 

MaryO: Giving Thanks for 30 Years

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Today is the 30th anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 30 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.  Even when I got to 10 years NED (no evidence of disease) from cancer, I couldn’t go back on the GH.

However, this year I went back on it (Omnitrope this time) in late June.  Hooray!  I still don’t know if it’s going to work but I have high hopes.  I am posting some of how that’s going here.

During that surgery, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last couple years, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my cortisol use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on this blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.  Unfortunately, Dr. Oldfield died a couple months ago.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days here at http://www.maryo.co/

 

Janice B, Pituitary Bio

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Cushing’s with a pituitary tumor. Had surgery on April 2013.

Surgeon nicked the pituitary gland giving me adrenal insufficiency. Sept 2016 went into adrenal crises while on holiday in Germany. I believe I was given too much prednisone as I have cushing’s again from too much prednisone.

I am working with my Endocrinologist plus an MD with a MSc who is an expert in nutritonal biochemistry.

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Nancy (chance), Steroid-Induced Bio

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golden-oldie

 

Originally posted April 18, 2008

I have Iatrogenic Cushings—I also have adrenal insuffiency —One doctor told me to just say I have Addison’s—I have many symptoms of Addison’s but I don’t have the salt issues. I have much empathy for the 52 year old man.

I am 60 and have been on cortico-steroids since 1979—everyday. It has beaten up my body alot-oh–I have steroid dependent asthma–I have essentially been in statis asthmaticus and/or on steroids for 30 years.

My allergist told me I have the twitchiest lungs he has ever seen. I am sharing this because anyone else on steroids for their asthma must have very twitchy lungs too.

I know I am lucky because I have never been on a respirator–Hospitalized yes.

I would like to hear from other folks with steroid dependent asthma or other Cushing’s folks.

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29 Years ~ Giving Thanks

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29-anniversary

Today is the 29th anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 29 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.  Even though I’m now 10 years NED (no evidence of disease) from cancer, I still can’t go back on the GH.

During that surgery, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last year, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my Cortef use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on another blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days at http://www.maryo.co/

LaDawn (NanaX3), Adrenal/Prolactinoma bio

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golden-oldie

 

I am a 54 old wife, mother and grandmother.

I have been terribly ill for 17 months with adrenal insufficiency and a prolactinoma. I do not know yet if it is a nonfunctioning tumor or not, but I suspect so since I do not have any of the Prolactin symptoms. I will be evalutated soon for that.

I have gone the whole nine yards at Vanderbilt University Medical Ctr in Nashville recently. This is after 17 months of hell and seeing doctor after doctor. No one would listen to me.

Last July I think I was actually dying and was probably in adrenal crisis. I had hypertension and hypotension epsisodes with two ER visits with extremely high blood pressure and stroke symptoms. I was seen by many doctors who were all headed in the wrong direction. I was basically told it was female problems, stress, menopausal, etc. etc….you know the routine..many have the same story.

However..mine has a twist. I was so desperate for help I went to see a Mennonite Naturopathic healer in Kentucky. His name was well known of helping so many people. He not only seen his Mennonite Clan but also saw many “English” as we are called. He does Iris Iridology. This is a very old time practice that is about faded away. It takes years to learn and I suggest if you go to one make sure they have done it for years.

He looked into my iris with a small eye magnifying glass. He told me all the problems that I have been diagnosed for years, Fibromyalgia, IBS, Sleep Apnea, Insomnia, hypertension, hypotension, digestive disorders, and early pancreatitis. Now this was different than the doctors as my sister told me NOT to tell him any symptoms at all, much unlike the conventional doctors who heard all my symptoms. Then he really shocked me when he told me I had adrenal problems and something wrong with my pituitiary!!!!! He gave me natural medicines that helped some but I knew it was not the final ending to this problem.

I went back to my FP at the time and told him my horrible symptoms of flushing, anxiousness, nausea, dizziness, digestive problems, inflammatory pain etc, etc. He finally checked my norepenephrine levels were 624! He then did a MRI of my adrenal glands…..negative.

But then he went back into the service and left me holding the bag…no referral no recommendations. I was ticked. I had to search for a new FP on my own. Finally I found a FP in my own county that everyone said loved a challenge. He thought I had a carcinoid tumor or an adrenal tumor.

After blood tests showed several things he sent me to Vanderbilt. After my first appt. they tought the same thing. However tests revealed that my cortisol was lower than a 1. Barely registering. No wonder I was so ill. They did a MRI of my pituitary and found a 6 mm tumor..suspected to be a Prolactinoma.

So the Mennonite man was batting100%, conventional doctors 0%. Well, I know I still need conventional doctors so I can’t beat them up too much.

However…why is it so hard to get doctors to listen…even my regular Endo missed all this last fall even though he suspected orthostatic hypotention? Men doctors are horrible, particularly for not listening to women and labeling them hysterical depressive menopausal ninnies!

Would love to hear from others please about their experiences too? Meds or surgery for Prolactinoma…what worked for you?

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