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Marie C (MarieConleyHbg), Pituitary/ BLA Bio

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Marie Conley is a consultant focusing on engagement and stakeholder strategies and fund development for a variety of clients through her company Conley Consulting, LLC.

During her tenure in politics (1994-2009), Marie was a trusted advisor to top-level government officials and private sector organizations beginning in 1994 as the scheduler to Governor Tom Ridge. In 2009, as a senior level fundraiser, strategist and event planner, she made a successful transition from Pennsylvania’s highly competitive political landscape into the equally challenging field of non-profit development as director of Penn State Hershey’s Children’s Miracle Network. In 2012, her focus was working with Sue Paterno, wife the late Coach Joe Paterno, to assist with a number of initiatives around the issue of prevention and awareness of child sexual victimization focused in the arena of higher education. Marie continues with the national experts Stop It Now! on its Circle of Safety for Higher Education. ™

Marie never takes any professional or personal task at face value. She is always looking for ways to improve efficiencies, outcomes and most importantly calls upon herself and those around her to do the right thing for the right reasons. Her accomplishments in such a short period of time at Children’s Miracle Network are only one example.

Marie was unanimously granted Governor Emerita status by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education for her more than 13 years of service. Until she submitted her resignation in May 2016, Marie served as the Vice Chairman for the Board of Governor member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and was Chair of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee. She spearheaded significant changes in policy regarding the recruitment and hiring practices for university presidential and chancellor searches and has re-evaluated and changed the policy for university presidential evaluations. Marie was first nominated in 2002 and was re-appointed by Governor Ed Rendell in 2004 and re-appointed by Governor Tom Corbett in 2012. From 1997 to 2011, Marie served as a Council of Trustee for her alma mater, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania. She played a critical role on the Board of Lincoln’s Footsteps commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. She continues to be a guest speaker and panelist on development and stakeholder engagement for a political and non-profit organizations.

But today Marie is facing her toughest battle yet. In 2012, Marie was diagnosed with Cushing’s Disease – a disease so rare it affects less than ten people per million each year. She has fought through dozens of hospital stays and numerous surgeries – including brain surgery – and still struggles daily to run her successful consulting business and a household that includes a husband and young son.

There’s a reason former Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge calls Marie “one of the most indefatigable people I’ve ever known.” Because while Marie drew the short straw in being one of those ten-in-a-million with Cushing’s, she has chosen not to simply live with the disease, but to use her skills honed in political campaigns to raise awareness and to fund critical research that will help those around the world who are living with this insidious disease. Already, The Conley Cushing’s Disease Fund has raised tens of thousands of dollars to fund research, to educate doctors on the signs of Cushing’s and to support her new book, A Cushing’s Collection.

Marie is not defined by Cushing’s. She is inspired by it to help others – and to leave a legacy of hope.
Marie hails from Bucks County, Pennsylvania; she lives in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania with her husband, Chris Lammando, and their son, Carter.


The author of A Cushing’s Collection: A Humorous Journey Surviving Cushing’s Disease, Diabetes Insipidus, and a Bilateral Adrenalectomy is a member of the Cushing’s Help message boards.

From Amazon:

Diagnosed with a rare disease that only affects between two and ten people per million, Marie Conley used emails to communicate with family, friends, and co-workers to keep them apprised of the diagnosis and prognosis of Cushing’s disease and the many complications she experienced on this journey. Her ironic humor and raw, emotional approach helps bring hope to those touched by this rare and unrelenting disease.

In her mid-thirties, Conley, who strived to keep herself healthy while maintaining the delicate balance of raising a young child, keeping a home, and a demanding career, began to experience a variety of unexplained maladies inconsistent with her life style.Because of the elusive nature of Cushing’s disease, the treatment is a long and complicated process of trial and error. At this time, there is no cure, largely due to the fact that Cushing’s disease is considered an “orphan disease.” As is her nature, she has decided to “adopt” this “orphan” and is doing everything she can to bring awareness to this disease.Conley’s tenacious spirit and determination would not allow this insidious disease to triumph over her life. Armed with her laptop as the only weapon available in the sterility of the recovery room, the author attacks the keyboard with a vengeance to let friends and family know that in this battle, there is no surrender.

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Melissa, Pituitary Bio

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From February 5, 2008

When I was 22 I had a pituitary tumor (cushings) which I had surgery for and thought I was cured but about 2 years ago I started having symptoms again and the tumor is back.

I am 32 now I wonder if this is really curable.

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Kathryn (Kathryn), Pituitary Bio

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Originally posted February 7, 2008

Hello,
My name is Kathryn and I am new to the site. I know it sounds silly but I feel a bit shy and embarrased about introducing myself. This is probably because I have spent so much time over the last eight years being very upset in social situations due to my appearance and inability to think clearly. Cushings has ruined a lot of my life and left me quite worried about the future, but I am trying to come to terms with it.

On the bright side I have been very lucky to have very uncomplicated surgery for removal of my pituitary adenome. I am on replacement of cortisol, thyroxine and soon to be on growth hormone. With a bit of luck I will soon be feeling better.

Unfortunately the excess cortisol has been masking severe osteoarthritis and so I will soon be going for a hip replacement.

 

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Aimee, Adrenal Bio

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I am the daughter of a Cushing’s patient who is workning on her BLA and switch. My mom is not always able to be on line, but is very interested in the networking that this site offers. So for right now I am the deligate and the Patient advocate whenever she is in the hospital.

Mom’s (Pat) history is complicated and lots of different turns have taken place. She was diagnosed very late into her case and has often had the worst of what can happen happen. A true trooper through it all but she is starting to really lose the desire to fight and yet more and more is happening. So I am hoping that the networking will help give her the little boost that she needs.

The brief run down: diagnosed Cushing’s, Pituitary surger (no tumor found), gama knife surger, chemical treatment, 4 – 5 years of sitting on the edge and then 4 years building back up to full blown Cushings.

Now she is have BLA in Feb. 08 and we are hoping to move forward. During the time between full blown she had 2 back fusions (1 did not take and will have to be redone) 2 knee replacements, and an assortment of other stuff. So as you can guess he poor body is worn out and ready for a rest.

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A New Newspaper Article on Jordy

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Today’s article: Father-of-two, 42, who was scared of heights now skydives from 17,000ft with NO FEAR after surgeons removed his ADRENELIN gland

Mr Cernik suffers from ultra-rare Cushing’s syndrome which causes high levels of the hormone Cortisol – a steroid that regulates the metabolism and immune system.

In just three years, former Territorial Army recruit Mr Cernik, who is 5ft 8in tall, ballooned from 11st 5lb to almost 17st.

To treat the condition, Mr Cernik underwent a series of brain operations and two procedures to remove his adrenal glands, which also produce adrenalin….

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4418714/Father-two-42-no-fear-operation.html#ixzz4ebhHkMsI

Read more about Jordy.

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Kate M, Pituitary Bio

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I find it amazing that it’s newsworthy in this day and age for anyone receiving support after a diagnosis.  Of course, a diagnosed person should be getting support as a matter of course.  If she had cancer, everyone would be all over this.

For Kara Murrow, the most rewarding moments as a teacher come when students learn about animals in the classroom. So it’s difficult for the Bonham Elementary fifth-grade science and social studies teacher to be away from school while she prepares for surgery.

“I enjoy it, and I know my kids enjoy the class and enjoy science because of it,” Murrow said. “With the science club I do after school once a week, the kids get upset when it gets canceled because of meetings. Not having it now is upsetting, too.”

Murrow was diagnosed this month with Cushing’s disease, a condition that develops when a tumor on the pituitary gland causes it to secrete too much adrenocorticotropic hormone. Murrow, who moved to West Texas from Arizona three years ago, said she has received support from Midland ISD employees and others in the local community.

Murrow’s mother, Louise Gonzalez, also appreciates Midlanders’ concerns for her daughter.

“People in Midland have been wonderful, considering how new we are to the area,” Gonzalez said. “The school district sent out the GoFundMe page and there’s been an outpouring of support for that. People at my church always ask me.”

Murrow’s family is collecting donations from the website GoFundMe to cover the costs of medical and travel expenses. Murrow and her husband, Kai, recently spent money on hospital stays connected to their 4-year-old son’s food sensitivities.

“They’ve been paying off those bills and doing OK until this came,” Gonzalez said. “Plus, she’s been going to the doctor about this. Because Cushing’s is so rare, doctors don’t recognize it.”

Murrow was diagnosed with the disease after medical professionals discovered a tumor on her pituitary gland. For six years, she experienced symptoms — including weight gain, dizziness and headaches — but said doctors couldn’t determine the cause. Murrow was thankful when she received an answer.

“It was a huge relief to finally have a diagnosis and know that I wasn’t crazy or making things up,” Murrow said. “It’s weird to be excited about a brain tumor. It’s a relief to know what was happening and that I have a solution.”

Murrow traveled this week to Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, where she’s scheduled to undergo surgery to remove the tumor. Though Murrow said recovery lasts several months, she hopes to return to the classroom next school year.

Jaime White, fourth-grade language arts and social studies teacher at Bonham, said both staff and students miss her presence. She said Murrow expresses concern for her students during her time away.

“She’s worried about how kids will do on the STAAR [State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness],” White said. “She doesn’t want them to think she abandoned them. The disease has to take center stage.”

At school, White said she noticed her colleague’s dedication toward helping her students understand science.

“She’s hands-on,” White said. “When it comes to science, she’s always making sure the kids are doing some sort of experiment. She wants to make sure the kids grasp it.”

Murrow teaches students about animals through dissections and presentations. Before she became a teacher nine years ago, she coordinated outreach programs at an Arizona zoo.

When she came to MISD, Murrow saw an opportunity to generate enthusiasm about science. She launched an invite-only science club for fifth-graders who show interest in the subject.

“I started it because there wasn’t really anything,” Murrow said. “They have tutorials for reading and math. There’s not a lot kids can do with science after school. They get science in the younger grades, but the focus is on reading and math. Science is something kids really enjoy.”

Though Murrow is disappointed about not being able to facilitate the club, she recognizes the importance of her upcoming surgery. She’s happy her mother, husband and two children will be in Phoenix for support.

“I hope that it will bring about a sense of relief to all the symptoms I’ve been dealing with and provide a chance for myself and my family to continue along with a full life,” Murrow said.

From http://www.mrt.com/news/local/article/Science-teacher-receives-support-after-11026581.php

A Stunning Woman Reveals The Devastating Secret Behind Her Weight Gain

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Vicki Perez first noticed she was gaining weight back in October 2015 – and in less than 12 months she had ballooned from 9st 4lbs to 12st 4lbs.

Her face began to bloat and her feet swelled so large that she couldn’t even wear shoes.

The shocked mum-of-one learnt she had Cushing’s disease, which is caused by high cortisol levels.

But it wasn’t until last January that she found out it was due to a deadly tumour on her pituitary gland.

After two surgeries to have the tumour removed, Vicki has finally began to recover and is sharing her story to raise awareness.

Vicki, who is currently studying to become a dental hygienist in Florida, said: “The gym and fitness has always been my passion.

“I train every day. So I was shocked when I noticed my face was getting puffy and my hands and feet were swelling like water retention.

”They were so swollen I had to wear men’s shoes and my clothes didn’t fit.

“I felt bloated all the time and I didn’t want to leave the house.

“I continued working out at the gym not realising I was causing damage.”

In February 2016, she noticed strange rashes on her hands and body and was rushed to hospital in anaphylactic shock.

Vicki said: “When I saw the rashes I thought it was an allergy but the next day I work up and I couldn’t breathe.”

Despite numerous tests, medics continued to deny there was anything wrong.

The fed-up mum decided to see a Cushing Disease specialist at The University of Alabama.

She said: “I took my MRI and CT scan and they saw the tumour was in my brain.

“My hospital had completely mis-read it.”

After further tests, doctors were able to confirm it was a brain tumour.

She said: “I’m not sure how long I had the tumour. I thought I was going to die.”

After an initial surgery to remove the tumour on the left of her pituitary in June, and a second op to remove a second tumour in July, Vicki’s health began to improve.

She said: “Two days after the first surgery and my feet were normal.

“I was excited, I felt great, I felt amazing but a month later I was back in hospital for the second surgery.

“The recovery was hard, it hurt to move. I had to teach to walk again and how to run again.

“I was angry and I was crying all the time. It messes with your hormones and makes you think you are crazy.”

The road to recovery has been long and after eight months, Vicki still has a way to go.

But now her weight is down to 10st 10lbs and she is able to wear shoes and her normal clothes again.

She said: “It’s a slow process.

“I am not 100% back to normal and any emotional stress can be dangerous for me and cause me to go into shock.

“But I am starting to see improvements and I’m just focusing on my son and school.”

Vicki added: “My son really struggled with seeing me so sick but now I am able to spend time with him, he is so much better and not acting out at school.

“He’s the most important thing, I couldn’t have got through this without him.”

From http://www.dailystar.co.uk/diet-fitness/594013/Gain-weight-bikini-fitness-model-brain-tumour

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