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Michael B, Pituitary Bio

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May 2015 diagnosed
June 2015 ipss
Sept 2015 transsphenoidal surgery fail
January 2016 metyrapone
May 2017 mri and seen something but in a dangerous place
Aug 2017 gamma knife
June 2019 waiting for gamma knife to work

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In Memory: Thomas F. Zachman ~ 1950-2010

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in-memory

 

Thomas “Tommy” F. Zachman, of Windsor, formerly of Toledo, Ohio, died suddenly and unexpectedly at University Hospital in Denver on June 3, 2010, complications of Cushing’s Syndrome.

Tommy was born Sept. 3, 1950, in Toledo. He was a graduate of Rogers High School and the University of Toledo and the University of Toledo Law School. He practiced law in Ohio. Most of his career was spent with West Publishing in Cincinnati which enabled him to enjoy extensive travel throughout the United States. He left his position at the company when it was sold.

He was an animal lover and always enjoyed his family dogs. He also enjoyed cycling, music, college sports and reading. Tommy was always available to help others with their problems.

 

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In Memory: Gregory J. Bart Jr., 2016

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in-memory

Greg died of a presumed heart attack at the age of 55.

September 19, 2015 he said “I was diagnosed hypertensive way back when I was 20. The condition remained for years, and became more acute with my cushings pit tumor. I still have high blood pressure, partially teated with three meds. I’ll have to consult my doc and see if this (Primary aldosteronism) may also be an issue.”


He wrote this about a year ago: On your daughter’s wedding day, you wouldn’t go down to the swap meet to pick out some second hand, ill-fitting dress, would you?

You would not.

If you were a baseball team manager getting ready for the World Series, you would not make a call down to your minor league affiliate and ask them to send up their 3rd best pitcher for the 7th game, would you?

You would not.

If you were being audited by the IRS, you would not go to the local high school and ask for assistance from the remedial accounting class, would you?

You would not.

And so, why would you not insist on, in fact demand, the very finest MRI equipment for your pit scan? A false negative is an invitation for massive bills down the road (for the blue pencil people in your insurance carrier’s claims dept.) and years of misery for you, the patient.

And you would not settle for a myopic tailor for that dress, would you?

You would not.

So, make sure your pit scan is done under the proper protocol, and looked at by an experienced hand. Without that, your time in the machine may be wasted.

You deserve the best. This disease will try to do it’s worst. Don’t let it, and don’t let your case be the one that falls in the cracks in the machine, or the system.


More information when it becomes available.

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Tim D (TimD), Undiagnosed Bio

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I’m going to tested and pretty sure i have it.

I don’t know what to put here except I was am glad I finally getting tested since reading stuff on the net I see I have a lot of the side effects and it sorta clears things up some,

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Jessica and Justin, Siblings In the Media

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From 2008: Siblings Deal With Rare Cushing’s Diagnoses

By KALEY LYON

klyon@dailynews.net

COLBY — As a junior in high school, Justin Kennedy began getting sick and missing school on a regular basis.

He was fatigued, unable to sleep at night and gaining weight rapidly. He also was unable to focus on his school work and began experiencing memory loss.

After several doctor’s appointments, Justin was diagnosed with Cushing’s disease, a rare disorder caused by excessive cortisol levels resulting from a tumor on the pituitary gland.

At the time of Justin’s diagnosis, his younger sister, Jessica, also was showing symptoms of the endocrine disorder. Her diagnosis came at the same time.

“I think they both have had symptoms since they were little,” said their mother, Judy Kennedy.

Other symptoms include a round facial shape, flushed cheeks, excessive hair growth, skin discoloration and depression, Judy Kennedy said.

Weight fluctuation is uncontrollable. Weight is gained at a high rate, despite diet, exercise and other efforts, Jessica Kennedy said.

“The weight has a mind of its own,” she said.

The diagnosis, following many doctor’s appointments and tests, came last November. Today, Justin, 19, keeps busy with a job at McDonald’s, and Jessica, 15, is a freshman in high school taking online classes.

One of the most bothersome symptoms of the disease is the toll it takes on the sleeping schedule. Her children often are unable to sleep until early morning, Judy Kennedy said.

“When there was a chance for her to do online high school, it was such a relief,” she said. “We don’t have to worry about what time she starts her school work.”

Appetite fluctuation is another side effect. The two go through phases where they have healthy appetites, then hardly eat at all, she said.

That’s because the disease puts their bodies through various cycles, which can last for less than a day or for months at a time, Judy Kennedy said.

It’s predicted that about 15 people in a million are diagnosed with the disorder, which can make it difficult to find support and get answers, she said.

The family, however, discovered an online support group and has enjoyed the opportunity to communicate with other families in similar situations.

“I honestly do not know where our family would be if I wouldn’t have found that support group,” Judy Kennedy said. “Even though it’s still awful, it’s better to know that other people have the same symptoms.

“There are people on the streets who have this and have no idea,” she said. “And their doctors don’t either.”

Both teenagers also are preparing for surgery. In mid-May, the family will travel to Houston, where the siblings will have the tumors removed from their pituitary glands. This is expected to resolve the hormonal imbalances, Judy Kennedy said.

“I’m looking forward to that day,” she said.

This Topic on the Message Boards


JESS AND JUDY ARE MEMBERS OF THE CUSHING’S HELP AND SUPPORT MESSAGE BOARDS.

Jess and Judy answered questions in an online Voice Chat January 17, 2008. Archives are available.

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Brian R, MENS Bio

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I became sick July 2014, August my family physician sent me for blood tests etc. by September, I saw thyroid surgeon, had CT and MRI of head throat area. I went to local hospital for the tests. The tests were inconclusive. Bad equipment, I later found out.

Surgeon said we should monitor condition and wait or we could do exploratory surgery. I CHANGED DOCTOR.

Next I went to Nuero for tests, nuropothy had already set in my legs and I was falling all the time. Rapid weight increase, tired and cramping all the time, irritable and miserable. She sent me to endocrinologist and more tests, definitely showed para thyroid adhesions, had surgery in October 2015, didn’t do both sides and would have to have surgery again in December.

Returned to work and immediately tore my shoulder muscles and was finished from work, (Workman’s comp) fought having a MRI, I did it anyhow, went to surgeon and he wouldn’t operate because of my health issues.

In December they removed the growth on other side of para and a lump from thyroid. Four days later I became wheel chair bound.

Now we scheduled the pituitary surgery for February. Wednesday was the surgery and I could get up from bed the next day and walk. (I thoight it was a miracle) Discharged Friday, went for blood test Saturday and tried to get some rest.

By Wednesday I returned to the emergency room with 103 temp and sleeping all the time. They put me in ICU and I spent the next 10 days there.

Upon release we treated the body shutdown with cortisol steroids and continually adjusted my blood pressure meds. Three months later I started therapy to learn how to walk again. I would fall if I turned my head, left or right. Balance and equilibrium was really bad.

I finally returned to play golf in October, exactly 2 years from my first surgery. Weak, but I was able to drive, walk, (gingerly) and socialize.

It is a terrible disease and in July this year I felt it was back and blood tests confirmed my fears. I won’t go into my current conditions.

We all know how this saga plays out.

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Faith’s Husband, Pituitary Bio

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My husband has Cushings, has had 2 pit surgeries, radation, and is still not any better.

We go to MGH Boston, love our endocrinologist, just wish we would see progress.

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