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In Memory of Barbara “Cookie” Rothenberg, Oct 11, 2003

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Saturday, Oct 11, 2003

The One and Only Cookie, photo taken by Erin
Columbus CUSH meeting, Saturday, October 26, 2002

From the posts on the message boards:

My heartfelt prayers and sympathy goes out to Cookie’s family, I never really had gotten to know Cookie Like many of you, but during a few chats, I saw how she helped many, answering questions, ect… and always willing to help out. My heart is sad to hear of her passing.


What I learned from Cookie was that she loved people and wanted to make a difference in the lives of those who suffer from Cushing’s. She touched many hearts, I know she touched mine….


Cookie was an inspiration to many of us. She gave her all for Cushing’s awareness, and I will always remember that the last time I saw her, she was singing…
Shalom, my friend.


Rest in peace, Dear Cookie. I know that right now you’re organizing angels into working teams who will get heaven straightened out, with fun and laughter all the way. I guess G-d needs you now more than we do.

We’ll miss you so much, Sweetie.


I was lucky to have gotten to meet Cookie. She is such a fun person and she could always cheer you up.


Cookie, gees, what can you say. She was dynamic, committed, determined, exasperating, poetic, driven, electric, comedic, funny, supportive, strong, loving, loved, and not to repeat, but a driving force in creating CUSH and helping those who needed it. She was wonderful with fundraising. She was involved in so many activies that were for the benefit of others. She has dealt with many challenges in her life and continued to passed the point that many could not.

She will be sorely missed by all who knew and knew of her.


She was just an incredible, delightful person. I really think this world is a little dimmer today without her light from within. I know a lot of us are missing her already. I remember talking to her about the upcoming conference and her enthuisiasm was contagious. I’m just so very, very sorry to hear she’s passed. I hope her next life is one without pain, where she can sing and write poems to her heart’s content. Cooke will be sorely missed.


My family and I met Cookie at the UVA Cushings Conference Fall 2002. She was so helpful and caring. She told my father, sister, and I her “Cushings Story.” She was so, well, there is no better word to describe her, “bubbly.” She was so happy to be there, teaching, learning, and helping with CUSH. She left an impression on my family and I. She had such a great personality. She was one of the very first “Cushies” I met…and she made me re-think my attitude about being sick. She was going through so much, yet she had such a wonderful attitude towards it all. She was amazing!


Cookie touched a lot of lives. I remember back on the “old board”–before any of us had met any of the others in real life–I would get these perky, cheerful and witty emails from Cookie. She had a signature that was some kind of rhyme including “Lookie, lookie,…Cookie.” Her little dollop of cheer in my “inbox” always made me smile.

It is terrible to lose her. She has left such a legacy, though, that she will go on touching lives for many years to come.


I think this fits Cookie perfectly:

Some People …
Some people come into our lives and quickly go
Some people move our souls to dance
They awaken us to new understanding
With the passing whisper of their wisdom
Some people make the sky more beautiful
To gaze upon
They stay in our lives for a while
Leave footprints in our hearts …
And we are never the same

— Anonymous

~~~

Cookie shared this poem  to show how she felt…

It was an awful state that I was in
Hair was growing on my chin
My moods were swinging from low to high
All I did was cry “let me die!”

The hair kept growing down my neck, chest and bod
Would some dr not think this was a little odd
Sometimes I was up day after day
Then I’d want to sleep all the time to chase my troubles away

Rather I’d eat nothing, something, or very little at all
It seemed getting fatter and fatter was my call
I had every symptom of menopause
Too young they said, it’s in your head, there is no cause

I sing so when I said “I have another octave that is below”
They said pack your bags, to the loony bin you go
My periods were off the dr’s. were lazy
After running tests they said I was crazy

Nine years passed, symptoms got worse and I got fatter
My arms and legs were thin, please help me, what’s the matter
I was beginning to think maybe they are right
Maybe I am just a wee bit up tight

But my husband would say find another dr. it has to be
You are not the girl who married me.
Our children were afraid to them I was so mean
I’d see myself doing and yelling and to myself I would scream
“What is wrong with you! stop it” as if I was in a bad dream

Then I went to a dermatologist for a rash I had
He took a look and and asked “What else to you is bad”
I poured out my heart, I cried and I said
I can’t take any more, I wish I was dead

He asked who I had seen and I gave him the list
And I could see on his face, he really was pissed
He got me to the Cleveland Clinic and the best dr. there
Who listened to me, and checked out the arms, legs and hair

The mood swings, personality changes, the ups and the downs
Voice lower and periods, and face and body so round
One thing he did was run the same tests
Over and over as the results were not the best

Nothing was the same result and so he knew
Surgery was what they had to do
Something is very wrong in my body he said
Let us take a look now or you will be dead

We think you have Cushing’s Syndrome or Nelson’s Syndrome, too
But we will do our best to help you
Let us open you up and we will explore
Then we will know rather we do less or more

As it turned out the x-rays did not know
What they would see and how much would have to go
My female organs had tumors, fibroids and all
They called this syndrome Stein-Leventhal

A complete hysterectomy is what was done
How I had children not one of them knew, not one
Upon seeing that problem to the adrenals they flew
And things were so bad they removed two

The adrenals, 13 times their normal size and had twisted so
On the x-ray they looked fine, but they both had to go
After that they knew and to me they said
There is a pituitary tumor in your head

But until it grows there is nothing we will do
And 15 years later is when it grew
By then CAT scans and MRI’s were everywhere
So even I could see the tumor there

And no more cutting open the persons head
Up the nose they went instead
Well here we go again, lucky me
The tumor was wrapped around an artery

We can’t take it all out but we will do our best and try
If we sever the artery, you will die
5 years later I was back and then
They took the tumor out again

I opted for radiation to kill my friend in my head
I got tired of the Cleveland Clinic saving me a bed
I had other surgeries and emotional problems but day by day
I was going back to the female way

You see I was very slowly turning into a male but how
Will I be come a women now
The next 8 years were very bad
Almost worse than the first 9 years had

I lost some weight, most of the hair went away
With Nelson’s Syndrome some of the Cushing would stay
I woke up one day and the sun was shining
I was no longer bitching, no longer crying

I was almost me except for the pounds
And the thin arms and legs and the body so round
I was accepting me my life was changing
All I needed was a little more rearranging

I was out in public, I was acting and singing again
Working, volunteering, how did this happen, when!
I still get little bouts of depression but then
I know why, I’m not scared, I feel them coming and when

So hang in there and I promise you
You’ll be doing the things you used to do
Maybe a little slower, maybe not as long
Things will brighten up, I know I am not wrong

Keep on looking the right doctor is there
I know what you are going through, I really do care
I am here for anyone to help with what I can do
We all are rooting and praying for you.

 

1955 and 1962 [Photographer: Cookie’s family]

1980-81, 3 years old, 2000 [Photographer: Cookie’s family]

2000 and 1998 [Photographer: Cookie’s family]

 

From the message boards thread about Cookie:

When Sue left a message on my answering machine this afternoon (October 11, 2003), I knew that something was terribly wrong. It never occurred to me that it could Cookie, our Cookie. Always so positive, cheery, full of life. Even though she was as sick as she was, again, I really thought that she’d pull through, one more time. How could she not? She’d survived pituitary surgeries way back, adrenal surgery, Nelson’s, Cushing’s, more than any one person should have to endure.

Throughout her too-short life, she’s been far too sick, yet she’s carried it all off with grace and enthusiasm.

First diagnosed with PCOS, Cookie had an hysterectomy years ago. During the hysterectomy, they realized that her adrenal glands were greatly enlarged. Cookie had Cushing’s disease and in 1974, Cookie had her adrenal glands removed, in 1989 she had her first pituitary surgery and in 1994 her pituitary was removed completely. Then radiation. Since these are the major glands that run the body, she has been on major hormone replacement for a long, long time, pills and daily injections. Because she had both adrenals and pituitary gland removed, she was also saddled with Nelson’s syndrome…and more medications. Because of her Cushing’s experiences, she helped to found the international CUSH organization to promote awareness of Cushing’s disease/syndrome and served as it’s treasurer and fundraiser.

In November, 2002 she had surgery for E.Coli in her sinuses, of all places (she told the doctor that she wasn’t snorting hamburg!) and in December she had a pacemaker put in.

In Feb, 2003 Cookie suffered a Code Blue. Her heart stopped and she stopped breathing. There were 15 people working on her to bring her back. She couldn’t feel her feet, then her hands were cold, then every little thing imaginable was happening with her. Then cardiac care, a heart attack. Cookie went on permanent dialysis. Her hands suffered permanent damage, Raynaud’s Disease. Her fingers turned purple and she had to wear white gloves all the time. She was bleeding internally again and her platelets were down.

I talked to Cookie after this last assault on her body and she was as cheery as ever. She wasn’t really ready to go home, but she walked 60 feet at the nursing home in several tries and if she could walk a total of 60 feet then her insurance would pay any longer. Her dialysis times were terrible. Tu, Th and Sa 8-11 PM. But her main complaint was that she couldn’t go out of state to be at the birth of a new grandchild.

Then the recent surgery to install a dialysis shunt, infections, complications…

How much can one woman take? No wonder she was tired of it all 😦

No matter how sick she was, she was always ready with a joke, a little song. On the recorder where people leave messages for the toll-free number, Cookie left a message May 17, 2002. I’ve always left it in the answering machine, so I could get a lift by hearing Cookie sing one of her inimitable parodies. If you’d like to listen, you can hear Cookie singing and laughing, one more time [file is missing – I’ll try to find it again].

I just cannot believe this. I truly thought of Cookie as a wonder woman who could do it all, and she could pull through this, too.

I guess she got tired of dealing with illness after illness, medications, surgeries, injections, dialysis, everything. I know I get tired just thinking about dealing with any one of these. Cookie put up a very valiant front through everything. She did more to get the word out than almost anyone I know.

Rest in peace, Dear Cookie. I know that right now you’re organizing angels into working teams who will get heaven straightened out, with fun and laughter all the way. I guess G-d needs you now more than we do.

Many thanks to Erin for this last look…


We’ll miss you so much, Sweetie.

In Memory: Kandace Bankston ‘Kandy’ Kline, September 9, 2007

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in-memory

Kandy’s Story…

Hi, I am a 39 year old woman. I have a putitory tumor for the last fourteen years. the tumor has kiilled my putitory gland. I no longer produce any hormones. I have been on steroids for over fourteeen years and now my organs are getting damage from the steroids. The doctor say I will die if I take them I will die without them. Everytime they try to lower my steroids I catch a severe infection. I usually hospitalized every three or four months because my body won’t fight the infection so They put me in give me iv steroids and antibiotics.

I have gone down hill so bad in the last two years I can no longer work or even clean my house the doctor wants me to limit my walking to two hundred feet that is impossiable to do with children. this disease is so frustrating as no one understand what you or going though. My husband has done a lot of research on it and he a wonderful support system. I had a very hard time finding a doctor that can help me. I was hoping I could find someone to talk too that is going though the same thing.

I live in constant pain and now the depression is so bad. I try so hard to be upbeat for my family but it is a efffort to get out of bed. I am thinking about going to Nashville clinc or maybe the mayo clinc. If anyone knows about these clincs please email me K-K_Kline@hotmail.com I would very thankful for any suggestions.

Kandy passed away September 9, 2007

Kandy Klein long-time member of the message boards passed away September 9, 2007.

Information about services and donation information.

Elaine, Adrenal and Pituitary Bio

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I have a tumot in both the pitutiary gland as well as the adrenal gland and doctors dont know which is secreting very high levels of of cortisol.

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In Memory: Dr. Edward Hudson Oldfield, September 1, 2017

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Dr. Oldfield was MaryO’s surgeon at the NIH November 3, 1987.  This was back in the olden days of transsphenoidal surgery.  I honestly expected to die but this man saved my life.

Dr. Edward Hudson Oldfield quietly passed away at home in Charlottesville, Virginia, surrounded by his family on September 1, 2017.

Born on November 22, 1947, in Mt. Sterling Kentucky, he was the son of Ellis Hudson Oldfield and Amanda Carolyn Oldfield. Ed is survived by his wife of 43 years, Susan Wachs Oldfield; a daughter, Caroline Talbott Oldfield; three siblings, Richard Oldfield of Mt. Sterling, Ky., Brenda Oldfield of Lexington, Ky., and Joseph Oldfield (Brenda) of Morehead, Ky.; nieces, Adrienne Petrocelli (Phil) of Cincinnati, Ohio and Keri Utterback (Brad) and nephew, Gabe Oldfield, both of Mt Sterling. His parents and a sister, Bonnie Lee Cherry, predeceased him.

Dr. Oldfield attended the University of Kentucky and graduated from the UK Medical School. He completed two years of surgical residency at Vanderbilt University and spent a year in Neurology at the National Hospital for Nervous Disease in London, England, before completing his neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt University. After a year in private practice in Lexington, he completed a two-year fellowship at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

In 1984, he was named Chief of the Clinical Neurosurgery Section at NINDS and from 1986-2007, he was the Chief of the Surgical Neurology Branch at NIH. He joined the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Virginia in 2007 where he held the Crutchfield Chair in Neurosurgery and was a Professor of Neurosurgery and Internal Medicine.

He led multidisciplinary efforts in the treatment of pituitary tumors and contributed to the research program in Neurosurgery at UVA. He often said it did not feel he was going to work because he so enjoyed every aspect of his career.

Dr. Oldfield was the author of over 500 original scientific and clinical contributions to medical literature and the co-inventor of patents on convection-enhanced drug delivery and genetic therapy. He served on the editorial boards of Neurosurgery and the Journal of Neurosurgery, where he completed a term of eight years as associate editor. Dr. Oldfield served as vice president and president of the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS). He received numerous awards including: the Public Health Superior Service Award; the Grass Medal for Meritorious Research in Neurological Science; the Farber Award; the Distinguished Alumnus Award, University of Kentucky Medical Alumni Association; the Harvey Cushing Medal; and the first annual AANS Cushing Award for Technical Excellence and Innovation in Neurosurgery.

In 2015 he received the Charles B. Wilson Award for “career achievement and substantial contributions to understanding and treatment of brain tumors”. A man of many interests and endless curiosity, Ed found joy in exploring the world around him with a great appetite for adventure, as long as it included variety and history. He preferred outdoor activities, and throughout his life enjoyed hiking, bird watching, photography and especially fly fishing, which provided the kind of peace he treasured in his limited free time. Learning was a priority in every activity. Ed was interested in genealogy and maintained a precise record of his family history, spending over a decade accumulating and scanning family photographs. It was important to him to know from where and whom his family originated. Though he loved to watch sports, especially the UK Wildcats, he did not always follow a particular team he cheered for the underdog.

His love of music was vast, from Arthur Alexander, Etta James, John Prine, Luciano Pavarotti, Van Morrison and Iris Dement, to name a few favorites. Friends and colleagues remember his gentle southern voice, particularly in his advice, “All you have to do is the right thing; everything else will take care of itself.” His family will remember him loving Shakespeare productions, a good barbecue sandwich, Ruth Hunt candy bars, a warm fireplace at Christmas and several beloved dogs.

A Memorial service was held on Monday, September 25, 2017, at the University of Virginia Alumni Hall at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to Edmond J. Safra Family Lodge at National Institutes of Health, Hospice of the Piedmont, or Piedmont Environmental Council.

From http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/oldfield-dr-edward-hudson/article_3bb9df83-d223-5d26-81f4-cfd4565ee0c6.html

In Memory: Cassandra Dills-Dailey ~ August 29, 2017

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Casey Dailey, age 38, was fighting Cushing’s disease, a pituitary gland disorder often caused by a tumor creating excess cortisol. She had surgery Aug. 23 and went home the next day. Over the following weekend, she began feeling sick. She vomited, sometimes with blood. Then, she couldn’t stand or talk, relatives said. A high fever started Sunday, after floodwaters surrounded her home, and she became unresponsive.

In the midst of Hurricane Harvey, one family’s cry for help was particularly acute. It was a medical emergency.

Casey Dailey was recovering from surgery at home and needed an ambulance on Aug. 27.

But floodwaters had reached the doorstep of her northeast Harris County home between Greens Bayou and Sheldon Lake.

Her husband, Wayne Dailey, frantically called 911 that afternoon. The line was busy. He dialed more than two dozen times and got through. Help was on the way, he was told, but no one showed up that day or the next.

“That’s when I went to social media,” said Darlene Zavertnik, Wayne’s mother, who lives in Montgomery County. “I went on Facebook and put together a letter.”

Friends and relatives began sharing the post. A cousin called volunteers while Wayne tried 911 one more time and asked for an air rescue. He was told that they were already on the list.

“You don’t understand. She’s dying,” Wayne Dailey recalls saying.

Feeling completely hopeless, he saw some people trolling in a boat just after noon on Aug. 29. Wayne ran out in the water to flag them down. The crew turned out to be the famous civilian volunteers from Louisiana’s Cajun country.

“They came to the house and they got her in that boat,” Zavertnik said.

The Cajun Navy transported Casey Dailey to an airboat. From there, she was loaded onto a dump truck. Confusion about emergency medical sites led to a stop on the side of the road, which is when she stopped breathing, relatives said. An ambulance finally arrived and paramedics worked on her 15 to 20 minutes.

“They got her to the hospital and they just could not …” Zavertnik said, her voice trailing off into sobbing. “We just don’t want anything like this to happen to anybody like her again. There has to be a much better system for this.”

The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences recorded 4 p.m. Aug. 29 as the time and date of Cassandra Dills-Dailey’s death at a Humble emergency room. One week later, the cause and manner remains pending. She is not listed among the institute’s storm-related deaths, which all involve drowning or electrocution in floodwaters.

Casey Dailey was 38. The devoted mother had two sons, 14-year-old Luke and Ronnie, 10. She homeschooled the oldest.

She also reached out with kind gestures, such as crocheting baby blankets for strangers who were expecting.

“She was probably one of the sweetest, most loving people you’d know,” Zavertnik said. “She was just always wanting to do what she could to help people, make them happy and make them feel good. She was very special.”

Adapted from http://m.chron.com/about/article/Mother-of-2-dies-in-Harvey-during-medical-12175042.php#photo-14053540

EvE7070, Pituitary Bio

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Hi and good evening new here So im EvE7070 and oh my were do i start.

I was finally diagnosed with Cushing‘s 2015 To wich i had no clue what it was and how horrible it would change my life.

But lets start before when it first started I was a gym rat and eat very lil and would do fasting often and one day my menstrual cycle changed and I stop getting my periods and after that I gained about 60 pounds out of nowhere and I decided to see a doctor who told me that I had a hormone deficiency and they put me on something called glucophage which instead of making me lose weight made me gain another 30 lb within the few months of taking it and nobody knew what was wrong with me or how to treat me and I was very depressed for so long because every time I would see a doctor they would say you’re obese and you need to get on a diet and I would cry and tell them I don’t eat I exercise everyday and I don’t understand what is happening to my body i all of a sudden had every disease you could think of and know doctor could tell me what was wrong

i even got a allergies to peanuts which I had never had a problem with before crazy right

So finally after so many yrs i stated getting headaches to witch they said migraines and then my eyesight started to get affected and finally they said no maybe it’s just a sinus infection to where I had to have an X-ray done of my sinuses and that’s when they saw the tumor and my pituitary gland

So had surgery 2015 was on remission until the beginning of this year I started getting headaches again and my eyesight was starting to mess up and decided to go back to the endocrinologist and now they tell me that my cushing‘s is back and I’m hoping that my MRI comes out okay and I don’t have a tumor again but I don’t know what the odds of that happening again of another tumor this is the hardest thing that I’ve had to go through and I’m having a really hard time trying to adjust again to everything that’s going on with my body they say the second time around is worse than the first time and so far it’s true emotionally my depression is at its highest

I’m having problems with coordination brain fog concentration problems forgetting what i was taking about and im really scared I won’t be able to deal with it this time It took me so long to get back to wat ever normal is and now im back here again

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Wendy I, Pituitary Bio

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Newly diagnosed (5/2019) with pit tumor, waiting for appt at U of M on 9/26.

 

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