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In Memory: Jenni Moore ~ January 25, 2016

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A young woman struggling with ill health after developing a tumour died from an overdose after “illicit insulin” was brought into the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital last year, an inquest heard.

Jenni Moore passed away at the intensive therapy unit on January 25, more than two weeks after sustaining brain damage while an inpatient at the hospital.

The 26-year-old from Halesworth had been admitted in December with complications from two unsuccessful operations to remove a tumour of the pituitary gland.

A Type 2 diabetic since 2002, Miss Moore suffered from emotionally unstable personality disorder and an abusive relationship, before a diagnosis of Cushing’s disease as a result of the tumour.

Consultant physician at NNUH Dr Franscesca Swords said Miss Moore had been exhibiting “alarming symptoms”.

“Cushing’s can cause Type 2 diabetes and needs much higher levels of insulin for it to work,” she told Norfolk Coroner’s Court.

“She was having incredibly low sugars, which is consistent with too much insulin. We had been reducing her dose steadily.

“We were giving her a fraction of the insulin she had been taking but her blood sugar was still low. Eventually the realisation came to ward staff there was something else at play here.”

Staff then began to discover insulin pens hidden in her room. During an investigation Norfolk Police interviewed Miss Moore’s partner Derek Soanes, who admitted he had brought her insulin pens at her request. No further action was taken.

Sarah Kennard, a lead health officer with Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, said in a statement that during a risk assessment in March 2014 Miss Moore said she “thought she was insulin resistant” as a result of her Cushing’s.

Assistant coroner for Norfolk Nicholas Holroyd recorded a narrative verdict.

“Jenni suffered significant and unhappy health conditions for a number of years,” he said. “Cushing’s exacerbates the diabetic condition to make the patient yet more vulnerable to sugar or hypoglycemia so higher doses of insulin are needed to correct the situation, which made her resistant in a sense.

“There has been evidence insulin was being brought to her in the hospital she should not have had. I do not believe she intended to take her own life. Nothing had occurred to drive her to an extreme act.”

After the inquest Miss Moore’s brother Joe said: “I loved my sister and so did the rest of my family, and we miss her every day.”

From http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/diabetic_died_after_overdose_from_illicit_insulin_brought_into_norfolk_and_norwich_university_hospital_1_4614300

Alicia (Alicia), PCOS Bio

1 Comment

Hi everyone,

I’m Alicia and I’m 18. I’ve been diagnosed with PCOS but it does not explain all of my symptoms. I used to be super athletic and played 3 sports. I got my period at 13 and it was regular. However, I started losing my periods.

At first they would come every few months but have since stopped completely. I have lost a lot of weight, especially muscle. I had to stop playing soccer because my leg muscles were giving out. At the same time I got very bad acne and started sweating through all my clothes. My hair started falling out of my head. I ordered rogaine at age 15 because the bald spots on my head were so embarrassing.

I’ve been on 3 different acne medications and accutane. I have been working since I was 14 but I can no longer stand through my shifts even though I am only working 5 hours at a time. I feel like absolute crap and the worst part is I’m so weak. And my appearance has changed a lot. My face is round, red, and my eyelids are swollen. I don’t recognize myself and can’t stand to look in the mirror. My arms and legs are sticks and I can’t gain muscle no matter what I try. I get sick all the time, I’ve had strep twice, oral yeast infections, UTIS in the past couple months.

I went to an endocrinologist about a year ago who tested for a bunch of common hormone problems. All of my adrenal hormones were high. Testosterone, DHEA, androstenedione, and aldosterone. However, my cortisol levels were never tested. I was told I have PCOS but there were no cysts on my ovaries.

I found a new endocrinologist who mentioned testing my cortisol levels, but later decided not to because I am underweight and cushing’s usually causes weight gain. To me, it seems like I could have the atypical kind, which causes asthenia instead of weight gain.

Let me know if anyone has suggestions on what to do now, I would really appreciate it. I am still in high school and I’m genuinely worried for my future if I can’t figure this out.

Peace and Love,
Alicia

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