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Ashleigh, Pituitary Tumor Bio

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I’m 28 years old. I had a pituitary tumour removed at the start of this year.

My main symptoms were weight gain, bright red stretch marks, joint pains, muscle loss and fatigue.

I was originally diagnosed with PCOS, but when diet and exercise caused no improvement I kept looking. Once the stretch marks appeared I was referred to an endocrinologist who conducted urine and blood tests. My cortisol levels were double the normal level. I was then referred to a surgeon who ordered an MRI and found the tumour.

The tumour was removed.I was in ICU the first night then a week more in hospital. It took me about 3 months to recover from the surgery. I am now recovering from the disease itself which is ongoing.

I do physical rehabilitation 6 days a week as well as regular seeing a dietitian, psychologist, endocrinologist, exercise physiologist and hormone specialist.

I’m hoping to return to work next year, which will be about a year after my surgery. I believe the disease has manifested for many years.

I think the perhaps the hardest part of the disease is the time it takes to get a diagnosis. I hope my story can help others get their answers sooner.

 

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In Memory: Kandace Bankston ‘Kandy’ Kline, September 9, 2007

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in-memory

Kandy’s Story…

Hi, I am a 39 year old woman. I have a putitory tumor for the last fourteen years. the tumor has kiilled my putitory gland. I no longer produce any hormones. I have been on steroids for over fourteeen years and now my organs are getting damage from the steroids. The doctor say I will die if I take them I will die without them. Everytime they try to lower my steroids I catch a severe infection. I usually hospitalized every three or four months because my body won’t fight the infection so They put me in give me iv steroids and antibiotics.

I have gone down hill so bad in the last two years I can no longer work or even clean my house the doctor wants me to limit my walking to two hundred feet that is impossiable to do with children. this disease is so frustrating as no one understand what you or going though. My husband has done a lot of research on it and he a wonderful support system. I had a very hard time finding a doctor that can help me. I was hoping I could find someone to talk too that is going though the same thing.

I live in constant pain and now the depression is so bad. I try so hard to be upbeat for my family but it is a efffort to get out of bed. I am thinking about going to Nashville clinc or maybe the mayo clinc. If anyone knows about these clincs please email me K-K_Kline@hotmail.com I would very thankful for any suggestions.

Kandy passed away September 9, 2007

Kandy Klein long-time member of the message boards passed away September 9, 2007.

Information about services and donation information.

Elaine, Adrenal and Pituitary Bio

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I have a tumot in both the pitutiary gland as well as the adrenal gland and doctors dont know which is secreting very high levels of of cortisol.

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In Memory: Dr. Edward Hudson Oldfield, September 1, 2017

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Dr. Oldfield was MaryO’s surgeon at the NIH November 3, 1987.  This was back in the olden days of transsphenoidal surgery.  I honestly expected to die but this man saved my life.

Dr. Edward Hudson Oldfield quietly passed away at home in Charlottesville, Virginia, surrounded by his family on September 1, 2017.

Born on November 22, 1947, in Mt. Sterling Kentucky, he was the son of Ellis Hudson Oldfield and Amanda Carolyn Oldfield. Ed is survived by his wife of 43 years, Susan Wachs Oldfield; a daughter, Caroline Talbott Oldfield; three siblings, Richard Oldfield of Mt. Sterling, Ky., Brenda Oldfield of Lexington, Ky., and Joseph Oldfield (Brenda) of Morehead, Ky.; nieces, Adrienne Petrocelli (Phil) of Cincinnati, Ohio and Keri Utterback (Brad) and nephew, Gabe Oldfield, both of Mt Sterling. His parents and a sister, Bonnie Lee Cherry, predeceased him.

Dr. Oldfield attended the University of Kentucky and graduated from the UK Medical School. He completed two years of surgical residency at Vanderbilt University and spent a year in Neurology at the National Hospital for Nervous Disease in London, England, before completing his neurosurgical residency at Vanderbilt University. After a year in private practice in Lexington, he completed a two-year fellowship at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

In 1984, he was named Chief of the Clinical Neurosurgery Section at NINDS and from 1986-2007, he was the Chief of the Surgical Neurology Branch at NIH. He joined the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Virginia in 2007 where he held the Crutchfield Chair in Neurosurgery and was a Professor of Neurosurgery and Internal Medicine.

He led multidisciplinary efforts in the treatment of pituitary tumors and contributed to the research program in Neurosurgery at UVA. He often said it did not feel he was going to work because he so enjoyed every aspect of his career.

Dr. Oldfield was the author of over 500 original scientific and clinical contributions to medical literature and the co-inventor of patents on convection-enhanced drug delivery and genetic therapy. He served on the editorial boards of Neurosurgery and the Journal of Neurosurgery, where he completed a term of eight years as associate editor. Dr. Oldfield served as vice president and president of the Society of Neurological Surgeons (SNS). He received numerous awards including: the Public Health Superior Service Award; the Grass Medal for Meritorious Research in Neurological Science; the Farber Award; the Distinguished Alumnus Award, University of Kentucky Medical Alumni Association; the Harvey Cushing Medal; and the first annual AANS Cushing Award for Technical Excellence and Innovation in Neurosurgery.

In 2015 he received the Charles B. Wilson Award for “career achievement and substantial contributions to understanding and treatment of brain tumors”. A man of many interests and endless curiosity, Ed found joy in exploring the world around him with a great appetite for adventure, as long as it included variety and history. He preferred outdoor activities, and throughout his life enjoyed hiking, bird watching, photography and especially fly fishing, which provided the kind of peace he treasured in his limited free time. Learning was a priority in every activity. Ed was interested in genealogy and maintained a precise record of his family history, spending over a decade accumulating and scanning family photographs. It was important to him to know from where and whom his family originated. Though he loved to watch sports, especially the UK Wildcats, he did not always follow a particular team he cheered for the underdog.

His love of music was vast, from Arthur Alexander, Etta James, John Prine, Luciano Pavarotti, Van Morrison and Iris Dement, to name a few favorites. Friends and colleagues remember his gentle southern voice, particularly in his advice, “All you have to do is the right thing; everything else will take care of itself.” His family will remember him loving Shakespeare productions, a good barbecue sandwich, Ruth Hunt candy bars, a warm fireplace at Christmas and several beloved dogs.

A Memorial service was held on Monday, September 25, 2017, at the University of Virginia Alumni Hall at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to Edmond J. Safra Family Lodge at National Institutes of Health, Hospice of the Piedmont, or Piedmont Environmental Council.

From http://www.dailyprogress.com/obituaries/oldfield-dr-edward-hudson/article_3bb9df83-d223-5d26-81f4-cfd4565ee0c6.html

In Memory: Cassandra Dills-Dailey ~ August 29, 2017

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Casey Dailey, age 38, was fighting Cushing’s disease, a pituitary gland disorder often caused by a tumor creating excess cortisol. She had surgery Aug. 23 and went home the next day. Over the following weekend, she began feeling sick. She vomited, sometimes with blood. Then, she couldn’t stand or talk, relatives said. A high fever started Sunday, after floodwaters surrounded her home, and she became unresponsive.

In the midst of Hurricane Harvey, one family’s cry for help was particularly acute. It was a medical emergency.

Casey Dailey was recovering from surgery at home and needed an ambulance on Aug. 27.

But floodwaters had reached the doorstep of her northeast Harris County home between Greens Bayou and Sheldon Lake.

Her husband, Wayne Dailey, frantically called 911 that afternoon. The line was busy. He dialed more than two dozen times and got through. Help was on the way, he was told, but no one showed up that day or the next.

“That’s when I went to social media,” said Darlene Zavertnik, Wayne’s mother, who lives in Montgomery County. “I went on Facebook and put together a letter.”

Friends and relatives began sharing the post. A cousin called volunteers while Wayne tried 911 one more time and asked for an air rescue. He was told that they were already on the list.

“You don’t understand. She’s dying,” Wayne Dailey recalls saying.

Feeling completely hopeless, he saw some people trolling in a boat just after noon on Aug. 29. Wayne ran out in the water to flag them down. The crew turned out to be the famous civilian volunteers from Louisiana’s Cajun country.

“They came to the house and they got her in that boat,” Zavertnik said.

The Cajun Navy transported Casey Dailey to an airboat. From there, she was loaded onto a dump truck. Confusion about emergency medical sites led to a stop on the side of the road, which is when she stopped breathing, relatives said. An ambulance finally arrived and paramedics worked on her 15 to 20 minutes.

“They got her to the hospital and they just could not …” Zavertnik said, her voice trailing off into sobbing. “We just don’t want anything like this to happen to anybody like her again. There has to be a much better system for this.”

The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences recorded 4 p.m. Aug. 29 as the time and date of Cassandra Dills-Dailey’s death at a Humble emergency room. One week later, the cause and manner remains pending. She is not listed among the institute’s storm-related deaths, which all involve drowning or electrocution in floodwaters.

Casey Dailey was 38. The devoted mother had two sons, 14-year-old Luke and Ronnie, 10. She homeschooled the oldest.

She also reached out with kind gestures, such as crocheting baby blankets for strangers who were expecting.

“She was probably one of the sweetest, most loving people you’d know,” Zavertnik said. “She was just always wanting to do what she could to help people, make them happy and make them feel good. She was very special.”

Adapted from http://m.chron.com/about/article/Mother-of-2-dies-in-Harvey-during-medical-12175042.php#photo-14053540

EvE7070, Pituitary Bio

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Hi and good evening new here So im EvE7070 and oh my were do i start.

I was finally diagnosed with Cushing‘s 2015 To wich i had no clue what it was and how horrible it would change my life.

But lets start before when it first started I was a gym rat and eat very lil and would do fasting often and one day my menstrual cycle changed and I stop getting my periods and after that I gained about 60 pounds out of nowhere and I decided to see a doctor who told me that I had a hormone deficiency and they put me on something called glucophage which instead of making me lose weight made me gain another 30 lb within the few months of taking it and nobody knew what was wrong with me or how to treat me and I was very depressed for so long because every time I would see a doctor they would say you’re obese and you need to get on a diet and I would cry and tell them I don’t eat I exercise everyday and I don’t understand what is happening to my body i all of a sudden had every disease you could think of and know doctor could tell me what was wrong

i even got a allergies to peanuts which I had never had a problem with before crazy right

So finally after so many yrs i stated getting headaches to witch they said migraines and then my eyesight started to get affected and finally they said no maybe it’s just a sinus infection to where I had to have an X-ray done of my sinuses and that’s when they saw the tumor and my pituitary gland

So had surgery 2015 was on remission until the beginning of this year I started getting headaches again and my eyesight was starting to mess up and decided to go back to the endocrinologist and now they tell me that my cushing‘s is back and I’m hoping that my MRI comes out okay and I don’t have a tumor again but I don’t know what the odds of that happening again of another tumor this is the hardest thing that I’ve had to go through and I’m having a really hard time trying to adjust again to everything that’s going on with my body they say the second time around is worse than the first time and so far it’s true emotionally my depression is at its highest

I’m having problems with coordination brain fog concentration problems forgetting what i was taking about and im really scared I won’t be able to deal with it this time It took me so long to get back to wat ever normal is and now im back here again

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Wendy I, Pituitary Bio

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Newly diagnosed (5/2019) with pit tumor, waiting for appt at U of M on 9/26.

 

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Taylor D, Pituitary Bio

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FLORENCE, S.C. – After struggling with a mysterious illness for nearly three years, Florence resident Taylor Davis is using her diagnosis of Cushing’s disease to raise awareness.

Davis was a healthy young adult when she started as a student at the University of South Carolina in the fall of 2015, but soon into her college career, she began experiencing several symptoms, such as weight gain, insomnia and panic attacks. Davis spent the next three years going from doctor to doctor trying to get a diagnosis for her symptoms.

Since her diagnosis, she has been trying to raise awareness through social media about her experience with Cushing’s disease.

Cushing’s disease is a hormonal disorder caused by high amounts of cortisol, or the stress hormone, in the body, according to the Mayo Clinic website.

During her freshman year, Davis began struggling with insomnia and started gaining weight. At the time, Davis brushed them off. Davis’s symptoms progressed to having panic attacks during her sophomore year.

“I’d be driving down the road, and my whole body would start freaking out,” Davis said. “I’d get heart palpitations, my heart rate would go crazy. I felt like I couldn’t breathe. It was intense panic attacks.”

In addition to the onset of panic attacks, Davis’ insomnia got worse, and she continued gaining weight. Davis also began losing clumps of hair, but she searched the internet and thought it was just normal.

The summer after her sophomore year, Davis said. she went to the doctor for answers with little luck.

“My doctor just kind of like brushed it off,” Davis said. “She told me it was probably just stress from school and stuff like that, and that I needed to diet and exercise more, but I was like, ‘A girl can only diet and exercise so much.’”

As Davis started her junior year, she said. her symptoms progressed to losing larger amounts of hair, which left bald spots that she tried to cover with extensions. At the time, Davis attributed the hair loss to bleaching her hair.

Then Davis began craving copious amounts of salt and large amounts of water.

“I started drinking water bottles by the case each day” and having to go to the bathroom frequently, Davis said. “It would just run straight through me.”

By the time the spring semester came, Davis’ panic attacks began causing blurred vision, nausea and dizziness. She said they felt like heart attacks.

Davis’ mother, Amy Lewis, got her admitted to McLeod Regional Medical Center for testing over spring break. Her kidneys were tested. An MRI and other tests were conducted, but Davis received no answers except that she was fine.

Davis’s panic attacks continued to get worse, so she and her mother began researching all of her symptoms for answers. Their research pointed them toward Cushing’s disease.

After another episode that caused Davis to pass out, her family took her to the emergency room. This time, the doctor had an answer: a brain tumor on her pituitary gland.

“It was so crazy the feeling I had at that moment,” Davis said. “I was so relieved, because I was so terrified for months at that point, and no one was going to help me because I had all of these problems.”

After the emergency room visit, Davis had to wait weeks for an endocrinologist appointment in Florence, but the doctor said she didn’t know enough to diagnose her.

She and her mom found an endocrinologist and neurosurgeon in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The encodrinologist told her Cushing’s disease is too rare for her to have and said Davis needed to lose weight. The neurosurgeon told Davis an endocrinologist would have to prove that the tumor was causing Cushing’s disease before he would take it out.

By this point, Davis medically withdrew from USC because she could barely walk to class.

Determined to get answers, Davis joined several support groups on Facebook for Cushing’s disease.

The Facebook group led her to make an appointment with Dr. Theodore Friedman in Los Angeles, who was able to diagnose her with Cushing’s disease in October of 2018. In November of 2018, Davis had surgery to remove the tumor from her pituitary gland.

Since the surgery, the tumor removal has caused adrenal insufficiency, so Davis has to take a steroid-replacement medicine. She has been weaning herself off the medicine so that her pituitary gland will begin making cortisol again.

Davis has been using social media, especially Instagram, to post updates on her journey with Cushing’s disease. While she was at USC, she was a public relations major, and she has always loved telling stories.

“It just came natural to me as it (Cushing’s disease) started happening to start sharing my story,” Davis said.

Davis said she receives a few messages with questions about her experience every day from people who see her posts.

“ That (Cushing’s disease) really gets to me sometimes, but talking to those people, helping other people and sharing my story, that brings me back up,” Davis said. “That’s what keeps me happy and keeps me from getting to that dark depression.”

Davis said she is also in the process of starting a YouTube channel to document her experience with Cushing’s disease, because she wants to help others as they go through the process of a diagnosis.

This bio is from https://www.scnow.com/news/local/article_9c54e1e6-9615-11e9-84d3-8ff51e77dc88.html

Gina, Pituitary Bio

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The pituitary gland

 

 

PCOS and I have a 2mm pituitary microadenoma

Some salivas high most are normal. I went to Dr. Findling and he was beyond rude and a waste of time.

I need a doctor close to Illinois.

 

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Lili, Pituitary Post-Op Update

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hi there…

i had the pituitary surgery.  They said i am cured (of course it could come back) but the day after surgery my acth level was 3.7 and the next day it was 1.  They consider that a cure.

it is a very painful recovery for me and i am documenting each day.

The headaches and pressure in my head were so awful and painful but have now on day 6 subsided.  They had to cut my septum to get through and i had a bone spur too so maybe that added to it…my nose was, still is i am sure, packed and i can’t blow my nose till July 12!  The nausea was bad too.  The cortisol withdrawal hasn’t been so horrible yet.  They have me on a taper program of each week taking less.

The tumor was towards the left side and the surgeon who was Dr. Van Gompel at Mayo was aggressive in the amount of tissue he took out as he said it was soft.  He wanted a “home run”.  I asked after if he got the home run and he said yes.

The whole Mayo experience was strange.  You don’t really get to call and speak to the doctor after you see them…you get a “desk” and a message gets sent.  The endocrinologist is the only one who calls back personally but I guess that is a lot.  I would highly recommend her and don’t know all her info except her name is Dr. Irina Bancos at the Mayo clinic.  Things just fell into place there.  As you know I was only scheduled for the IPSS but when she saw how symptomatic I was and all my levels she picked up the phone on a Tuesday and had me scheduled for surgery Friday morning.  A one stop shop.  I was scared and there alone but got through it.

The next 3-12 months will be difficult.  I am currently on some pain meds and muscle relaxers but in touch with my sponsor daily and we decided I don’t have to be a martyr.  I just need to check myself and get off them as soon as I get these headaches under control.

Mary, I’d like to stay active on your site.  I’ve learned so much that helped prepare me for the doctors appointments and the procedures that I’d like to give back anything I can in the way of my experience of living with the symptoms and not knowing what was wrong with me to fighting for a diagnosis to the cure.  Please let me know the best way I can do this and you may post this if you’d like.  Maybe edit out the pain meds and sponsor part as I don’t think many would relate to that but who knows.

I just know I am grateful to you and this site.

Lili

 

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